Start Making Sense: The Commercialization of Cancer

Started by mike-verano, May 29, 2016
6 replies for this topic
mike-verano

Member
558 Posts
Posted on
May 29, 2016
There is a new cancer center commercial that, quite frankly, freaks me out. At first, I thought it was just me being upset that my zone-out time watching golf (I know, it’s hard to get more couch potato than that) was interrupted several times by cancer. I realized that it was not just the “pardon the interruption” component when my wife overheard the commercial and had the immediate response, “Turn that off. That’s so wrong. You can’t talk to cancer like it’s a person!”

I feel the need to preface this rant with acknowledging that, of course, I feel for the people in this commercial. They are, reportedly, real survivors and real physicians and I send my blessings and peace to all of them. The script they were given, however, leaves me feeling like someone has jumped on the political bandwagon and created the first attack ad against cancer. In a time when mudslinging and vitriol are running wild, do we really need to get all “in your face” about cancer and its treatment? Is hating cancer and what it has taken from us really going to move us forward in understanding the mechanisms involved in cancer cell growth? Will warning cancer that “we’re after it” lead us to less devastating forms of treatment? Personally, I prefer that those involved in the process come at with a more compassionate, questioning and determined attitude than that of “Cancer, you suck!”

Whether we will defeat cancer in this, or any, lifetime is certainly a question worth asking. And if anyone should have a say in the matter, survivors and family members who’ve lost loved ones to the disease should top the list. When those voices are put together in a collage and then entered into the public discourse, I think we owe it to everyone to keep that dialogue sane, civil and useful. 

Since I was not consulted prior to the commercial being released, I would like to, with tongue firmly in cheek, offer two pitches for the next advertisement:

Pitch #1:

Scene opens to reveal a chemotherapy room. Chairs are arranged in a circle, with IV poles and monitors next to each. Chairs are empty, and dim sunlight filters the room with a warm glow. In complete silence, a nurse walks across the room, pauses for a moment at each chair, and then walks over to the only monitor still on. The camera zooms in on the face of the monitor and the nurse flips the “off” switch. She walks out of the room, closes the door, and is seen hanging a sign just below the words Treatment Room. We hear her footsteps fade out as the camera zooms in on the sign that reads, “Going Out of Business.” 

Voice over: (I’m thinking James Earl Jones-like) “Working toward the day.”

Pitch #2:

Viewers see me (I always wanted to be on TV) sitting on the couch, with my Great Dane, Daphne, curled up next to me. Looking straight into the camera with a serious look on my face, despite the dog gnawing on a red snake chew toy, I say, “Hey cancer, I wanted to have a word with you, and then I realized you’re not a person, and talking to you might not make any sense. Not only do you not have ears, mouth, eyes or nose, you also have no soul.” 

I turn to the to Great Dane and start talking to dog. “Isn’t that right, girl? Cancer ain’t got no soul.” I grab the chew toy, look it straight in the eyes and say, “Ain’t that right snake?” 

I squeak the toy and hand it back to the dog.  

Scroll comes up reading, "Brought to you by the Council for Compassionate Cancer Care (4C) We Foursee (I really should get paid to do this) a life free of cancer."
Report

Page 1 of 1 1

KatieL

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
May 29, 2016
I haven't seen the ad Mike refers to, but I think I would find it objectionable, too. Personification of cancer doesn't really help, does it? I also object to all the fight/war terminology used. Mostly it implies a toughening up, a constant state of readiness to do battle, which, as an eight-year survivor of multiple myeloma would be totally exhausting, if you think about it. I think a more peaceful approach is needed: strengthening the body and mind to do treatments, tests, face the uncertainties in the cancer journey. Yes, of course, I wish I didn't have cancer; who would want to join that club? But we can learn to live with the illness and all that it entails in order to keep living as well and as long as we can. Challenge? Certainly. It is a matter of deciding how you are going to meet that challenge that is the question. We could use GOOD ads which show people meeting the challenge well.
Report
mike-verano

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
May 30, 2016
Katie, I completely agree with your approach. If you want to see the ad just click the word "commercial" in the post. It hyperlinks to the site.
Report
Denis

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
May 30, 2016
I particularly like Pitch #1. After reading it, I found myself just looking out the window, staring at nothing, and contemplating the day. It made me feel happy and sad at the same time, I guess. As a a 70 year old Williamsburg Lymphoma survivor, it's somehow heartening to have a fellow area survivor putting into words so eloquently what many of us feel. Thanks! DenisP
Report
Katieb684

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
May 30, 2016
Love, love, love your pitch #1. Fantastic message and imagery. (BrCa 2003) Kathleen
Report
Frebeach

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 03, 2016
The ad may not be tasteful for some, but the lament about expecting a cure for cancer is much closer than you would have guessed. I speak of the wonderful animal experiments done and the start of the approved first human study and Princess Margret Hospital in Toronto and the University Health Network. The idea is a completely new way to tackle this scourge by combining cold laser technology,from Theralase, with new chemistries of Photo Dynamic Compounds developed at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, near Halifax. The concept is simple. Expose the compounds with certain wavelengths of light after they have reached the tumour. This action caused the compounds to release activated Oxygen which in turn, splits the DNA, resulting in cytosis. This is a one shot procedure with no apparent side effects. Based on previous animal studies, there is an added immune effect documented so that the same cancer does not return. The three phases may only take 3 years, then roll out. Follow this story closely. Dave in Toronto
Report
TanyaDean

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 22, 2016
I agree with KatieL too. Even if someone clicks onto it, new window appears.
Report

Page 1 of 1 1

You must log in to use this feature, please click here to login.
$auto_registration$