Stigma and Lung Cancer

An article recently published in a special issue of CURE focused on lung cancer, “Quitting Smoking Is Possible and Reduces Cancer Risk,” has generated discussion on social media and in our Discussion Forum.
BY CURE STAFF
PUBLISHED: JANUARY 10, 2017

An article recently published in a special issue of CURE focused on lung cancer, “Quitting Smoking Is Possible and Reduces Cancer Risk,” has generated discussion on social media and in our Discussion Forum.

While the article explains and lists several non-smoking-related causes of lung cancer, it also discusses some of the health risks associated with smoking and suggests ways to modify these risks through proven, effective smoking-cessation programs.

There is no doubt that smoking greatly increases the risk of lung and other cancers, and that smoking cessation through various means has lowered the number of lung cancer cases and mortality. An article covering these topics is in line with CURE’s commitment to addressing modifiable cancer risks.

We believe that there should be NO STIGMA associated with lung cancer, regardless of whether a patient or survivor is a smoker, a former smoker or a never-smoker.

We support research and funding for all diseases that affect us, regardless of causality, as well as the education of the cancer community about these important issues.

 



Talk about this article with other patients, caregivers, and advocates in the Lung Cancer CURE discussion group.
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