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The Little Couple has cancer

BY Kathy LaTour
PUBLISHED March 20, 2014
Kathy LaTour blog image
OK, I admit that I like a reality show called The Little Couple. I happened on it one night last year and was struck by how authentic Bill Klein and Jen Arnold came across. The premise of the show is to take part in the lives of a husband, Bill Klein, and wife, Jen Arnold, MD, as they marry, build their dream home in Houston and grow their family with two adopted children from abroad. And they happen to be little people, the polite term for those who suffer from some form of dwarfism. I was impressed with Bill and Jen and their efforts to show the world that little people are just like everyone else. I don't know their goals for allowing cameras in their lives, as it has to be incredibly intrusive, but with this show it works. As a neonatologist, Jen Arnold is a working physician, and Bill Klein is a businessman. Then, as anyone who follows the show knows, while in India to pick up their adopted daughter, Zoey, Jen begins to bleed. A call home to her gyn results in a speedy trip back to the states where she is met by her mom and dad at the airport and then begins a series of tests to understand what is going on. It's cancer. And quickly, the reality TV show became almost too real for those of us who have been there. As the build up to the show where we learn the details of Jen's cancer, I am sure most cancer survivors were saying, "It's cancer. We know the signs." Jen was diagnosed with gestational trophoblastic neoplasm, a very rare cancer that occurs in the tissue remaining after a failed pregnancy. There were details not on the show but in the news about her treatment that I am not sure have yet occurred. For example, according to news accounts, chemo didn't seem to work at first, so they did a complete hysterectomy. Since, on this week's episode we saw Jen getting chemo, I don't know if the surgery is to come or if they already completed it and have moved on. At any rate, I am glad that Jen continues to affirm many details of the cancer experience. For example, when she said the side effects of chemo seemed to be cumulative, it bothered me that even now, for a professional in the medical field, she still was not told that one fact. Chemo side effects are bad and they get worse with more treatment. She has addressed the fatigue, which no one can tell you about until you experience it. I am glad we got to go with her to look for a wig and saw the quality she found at a shop that caters to those going through chemotherapy. We have such a shop here and it makes such a difference. Boy have wigs gotten better since the nasty things I wore in 1986. Mostly, I am glad they decided to take the camera into chemotherapy with her and not gloss over it in the story line. I am sure the producers have had some serious talks about how much is too much when the other story line at home is the beautiful little Zoey with her big eyes, seriously smart and tender big brother Will and a father who is clearly terrified. I applaud them for keeping the reality in reality television. Those who are newly diagnosed will find a friend in Jen as they struggle with the same issues. I just hope they let her continue to talk about the changes cancer has made in her new family like living with the fear of recurrence -- and then celebrating when the cancer stays gone. Once again cancer reminds us that it doesn't matter who you are and what you are doing. Jen, there are many who are with you and we send you our collective strength for the journey ahead. -
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