Article Talk: Rebounding for Lymphedema

Started by Frau, September 17, 2016
1 reply for this topic
Frau

Member
558 Posts
Posted on
September 17, 2016
Original Post

This article is very informative to me, as I was recently diagnosed with lymphedema in my chest, trunk, and both arms. I am still waiting for my customized compression sleeves. I had my bilateral mastectomy over two years ago and just ignored the pain as being part of getting older. My advice to others is to be aware that lymphedema doesn't always occur immediately after surgery!
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LymphActivist

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
September 18, 2016
Please be careful about reading too much into this thread. My observations based on reading the posted notices, corresponding with Mr. Scrivens directly, and reading the available references to rebounders: Mr. Scrivens is NOT a doctor. Mr. Scrivens uses the title "Lymphologist", but he is not a lymphologist as the title is used in Europe for medical doctors who have completed specialty training in the lymphatic system and its pathologies. The lymphology he refers to is not the medical specialty taught in medical schools. He admits in private correspondence that he is not a doctor. Nowhere in the rebounder literature he posts on his commercial website is there a shred of data showing the effects (either beneficial or damaging) of rebounding on a patient who has lymphedema. All references are to the generalized beneficial health effects on the body of a person with a normally-functioning lymphatic system. The extrapolation of these beneficial effects to a person with a lymphatic system which is functionally impaired is without any scientific basis. Statements in the article would have you believe that the lymphatic system has no intrinsic means of moving lymph except through physical exercise. This is not true. While the lymphatic system has no centralized pump, as does the circulation system, it does have a distributed pumping system where every lymphangion (lymph vessel) is capable of contracting, and together with the one-way valves between lymphangions, transporting lymph. This system is energized by the autonomous nervous system and controlled by pressure and motion sensing within each lymphangion. Lymphedema therapists know about this system, and get lymph flowing at the beginning of each session through gentle stroking (effleurage), and this is the basis of "dry brushing" as a lymphedema treatment modality. Another "fatal error" in the rebounding hype is the assumption that if rebounding is good for the health and welfare of the lymphatic system of a healthy person, then it is good for persons with lymphedema. This may not be true since the generation of additional interstitial fluid because of the increased blood circulation increases the load on an already overloaded lymphatic system. Lymphedema is the inability to move fluids because of a deficient lymphatic system--how can increasing its load be beneficial? I hate to bring these things up to a list read by patients desperately seeking relief and cure of a medical problem, but I sincerely believe that improvement of lymphedema is not to be found in the trampoline. Robert Weiss, M.S. Lymphedema Treatment Advocate
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