Howard Hochster, MD, Explains Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines

Started by Tonia, March 16, 2015
2 replies for this topic
Tonia

Member
558 Posts
Posted on
March 16, 2015

Howard S. Hochster, an oncologist at Yale Cancer Center who specializes in gastrointestinal cancers, explains that screening for colon cancer is recommended to begin at age 50 due to the increase in cancer incidence at that age. However, adults under 50, including those who may be considered at high risk due to factors related to genetics or lifestyle, can also be diagnosed with the disease. "It's still kind of rare to have people in their 40s develop colorectal cancer," he says, but it does happen. 

Current guidelines recommend individuals age 50 and older receive colonoscopies every 10 years if they do not have a history of polyps. If a screening exam has identified polyps, more frequent colonoscopies may be recommended. 

For people who are at higher risk, they should be screened earlier, around age 40, he says. A common high-risk factor includes having a first-degree relative with a history of colorectal cancer, especially if that family member was diagnosed before age 55. 

For more information on colorectal cancer screening and prevention, visit curetoday.com/tumor/colorectal/prevention/CDR0000258007.
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Anonymous

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0 Replies
Posted on
March 16, 2015

Howard S. Hochster, an oncologist at Yale Cancer Center who specializes in gastrointestinal cancers, explains that screening for colon cancer is recommended to begin at age 50 due to the increase in cancer incidence at that age. However, adults under 50, including those who may be considered at high risk due to factors related to genetics or lifestyle, can also be diagnosed with the disease. "It's still kind of rare to have people in their 40s develop colorectal cancer," he says, but it does happen. 

Current guidelines recommend individuals age 50 and older receive colonoscopies every 10 years if they do not have a history of polyps. If a screening exam has identified polyps, more frequent colonoscopies may be recommended. 

For people who are at higher risk, they should be screened earlier, around age 40, he says. A common high-risk factor includes having a first-degree relative with a history of colorectal cancer, especially if that family member was diagnosed before age 55. 

For more information on colorectal cancer screening and prevention, visit curetoday.com/tumor/colorectal/prevention/CDR0000258007.
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PVP

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0 Replies
Posted on
March 22, 2015
This "article" is pretty worthless. My father died of CRC at age 34, yet this MD is recommending starting colonoscopies at age 40? Because it isn't economical to test HNPCC's? A blaring example of GI's who don't concern themselves with genetics.
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EllenK

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Posted on
June 04, 2015
I wish the guidelines were earlier than 50. I went for a routine colonoscopy and had stage 3 cancer. I had no symptoms. If It was recommended to have one earlier, it would have been caught before it turned cancerous.
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