Article Talk: Crowdfunding for Cancer Care: A Virtual Safety Net

Started by annon123456, March 15, 2017
1 reply for this topic
annon123456

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558 Posts
Posted on
March 15, 2017
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I used gofundme. They take about 9% (between them and wepay the platform they use for your funds - youcaring also uses wepay). 1) You need to think very seriously about your privacy. A google on your name brings up your gofundme page on google's first page. If you are on the job market (like I am - I was fired for having 2 cancers in one year, one with no cure, was told I was too expensive for their insurance, still only have had a string of part time and temporary jobs - hard to get junk jobs with too much education - an issue I am running into, hard in my field to get another permanent job if you have a gap in your resume and are over about 45 or 50...) as many will not hire you if they see you have had cancer, or were begging electronically. My solution was to change my name on my facebook page (I already take the precaution of using a fake name on all cancer lists/forums as you never know who is on those who might accidentally blow your cover) although that is not ideal. Had I known about you caring back then I would have used them as I could have left my facebook alone (they are not linked to it and so you don't have to use your full name). 2) Make sure you page is ready to go - layout, photos, etc. - when you make it live. You only have one chance for your launch. Google crowdfunding and page layout, information to include, number and kind of photos, ways to spread the word... to make sure you have done everything you can to optimize your chances to be funded on day one. 3) It is highly unlikely that total strangers will donate. Friends of friends maybe but total strangers out of the blue - not so much so (research backs this up). 4) It is also highly unlucky that your page will go viral. Those that do the people (eg the people with the fundraising page) usually have had a lot of local media coverage or friends in the news industry. 5) Instead of thinking this will solve your financial problems, because odds are not in your favor that you will get what you need, recast your thinking to be happy with whatever you get rather than panicked that this does not solve the financial toxicity of cancer. Too depressing to think about it otherwise. Plan for what you will do if/when it doesn't come anywhere near meeting your goal. 6) Related to #5 realize that since this is highly unlikely to solve your financial problems, start making your cuts in your budget now. I had to choose to be homeless for 19 months (as my state did not expand medicaid) after I lost my job. I finally realized that I had to make a choice between health insurance and rent. It would have been helpful if I had realized that about 8 months earlier and so could have used all that rent money on health care. I finally got into hud (rent assistance) housing, have had to sell most of what I own, part with my younger cats (which about broke my heart because I loved them, just have my elderly ones now), and what is perhaps hardest of all, can't help my 25 year old daughter and my young grandchildren as much as I would like to as I often don't have enough money myself. Life sucks at times. The financial toxicity of cancer sucks. It is what is and there are way more of us in this financial disaster pit than there are random donors to bail us all. 7) Donor fatigue is real. If your problems continue many people start to blame the victim, figure there is something wrong with you if still are drowning in medical debt months later or are still only marginally employed... If you also get food stamps (like I do) or live in hud housing (like I finally do) you often get negatively judged as a freeloader and lazy no good bum... Don't take it personally. It is what it is and often people just plain don't understand until they have lived through it too... some just can't imagine this kind of "bad luck" happening to them - it only happens to others who refuse to work hard and plan for the future... Good luck if you try this. I am extremely grateful for the help I got even though I did not meet my goal, am currently drowning in medical debt, am likely not to have enough money to keep insurance this year (no subsidy so have to pay full price since I am below the poverty line and this state did not expand medicaid) and likely re-advertising my gofundme isn't going to get me much because this has "gone on too long", friends are "tapped out"... Over several years around $17,800 was donated (of which I saw about 90% of that due to fees) and all of it went just to medical (I was homeless during much when donations were made and didn't spend any of it on rent)...none left. If you are curious (not expecting any donations as I know you wouldn't be reading this article if you weren't desperate too) mine is https://www.gofundme.com/78d3nc
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MichaelBane

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0 Replies
Posted on
January 11, 2018
Funding for good cause is always appreciated by others. When it comes to the cancer patients, they have to suffer from physical, mental and financial loss. Charity and donations are good options but participating in mission humanitaire ( http://www.mission-humanitaire-afrique.org ) aid programs to provide them the assistance and support will give the difference experience in the humanity.
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