Tired, Tired of Being Tired, but not Quitting

Started by anonymous, November 16, 2015
14 replies for this topic
anonymous

N/A
N/A
Posted on
November 16, 2015
Call it tired. Call it fatigue. Call it a result of cancer or cancer’s treatment — or not. I would simply like to have the energy to “pop” out of bed and begin my day like I began my days before cancer. Most days I wake to find myself still tired, again. No, I am not depressed — I get out of bed every day. I like my life. I just want more energy to apply to my life. After breast cancer over five years ago and melanoma over one year ago, I want my drive back. I am motivated to live. I want to live. I just want to live more energetically. As a cancer survivor, do you struggle with this too?

The last time I wrote about cancer fatigue, I mentioned going to the doctor and all the tests that were run. So far, they have all pretty much come back “normal.” (I would strongly suggest to fellow survivors struggling with fatigue that they keep asking their generalist to run tests and to refer them to specialists for tests as well. It is worth pursuing this symptom. It is important to pursue this symptom. Good rest is so very, very important for the mind, body and emotions. Be persistent).

The most recent test I just took was a sleep study. I found out I have sleep apnea! I stop breathing about twenty times per hour at night. Twenty times per hour is actually at the low end of moderate sleep apnea. With my CPAP machine, this appears to be dropping to around seven times per hour. My understanding is that is pretty close to “normal,” which would be someone who would not need to have a CPAP machine. Sleep apnea is more common than I had previously realized. Sleep apnea is sometimes related to weight gain (and yes, I have been struggling with my weight), but it isn’t always related to being overweight. It can be a structural issue with someone’s airways and there are other reasons too.

In my case, I have not noticed a significant difference in my energy level since starting to use the CPAP. This frustrates me, but I won’t quit. I will keep using my CPAP and I will keep trying to find answers and solutions to my fatigue. Why am I mentioning all this? I want you to be stubborn if you are tired. Keep working on answers. Maybe a CPAP is what will help you. Maybe something else will be helpful. Don’t quit.

There are also studies that talk about how the type of light before lights out may affect energy level and fatigue upon waking. I believe it is the bluish light that some studies say is the problem. Screen time including television, computers, phones and tablets may adversely impact sleep quality as well. I am going to read up on these studies and try a couple things — possibly going back to print media reading before bed and/or trying yellow/brownish tinted glasses over my readers if I am reading from a screen!

I also continue to hope that tweaking the CPAP will help me. I am trying to work on exercising and eating better, too. I guess I feel like I can constantly whine about and be frustrated by my fatigue or I can keep working on it. I choose to keep working toward a solution.

I am a survivor. We are survivors. So far, we are still here and still fighting. I am not a quitter and neither are you. Let’s continue to pursue our fatigue and press for solutions. The answers are out there and together we can find them! Please let me know what is working and not working for you if you, too, struggle with fatigue.
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BarbaraTako

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 16, 2015
Call it tired. Call it fatigue. Call it a result of cancer or cancer’s treatment — or not. I would simply like to have the energy to “pop” out of bed and begin my day like I began my days before cancer. Most days I wake to find myself still tired, again. No, I am not depressed — I get out of bed every day. I like my life. I just want more energy to apply to my life. After breast cancer over five years ago and melanoma over one year ago, I want my drive back. I am motivated to live. I want to live. I just want to live more energetically. As a cancer survivor, do you struggle with this too?

The last time I wrote about cancer fatigue, I mentioned going to the doctor and all the tests that were run. So far, they have all pretty much come back “normal.” (I would strongly suggest to fellow survivors struggling with fatigue that they keep asking their generalist to run tests and to refer them to specialists for tests as well. It is worth pursuing this symptom. It is important to pursue this symptom. Good rest is so very, very important for the mind, body and emotions. Be persistent).

The most recent test I just took was a sleep study. I found out I have sleep apnea! I stop breathing about twenty times per hour at night. Twenty times per hour is actually at the low end of moderate sleep apnea. With my CPAP machine, this appears to be dropping to around seven times per hour. My understanding is that is pretty close to “normal,” which would be someone who would not need to have a CPAP machine. Sleep apnea is more common than I had previously realized. Sleep apnea is sometimes related to weight gain (and yes, I have been struggling with my weight), but it isn’t always related to being overweight. It can be a structural issue with someone’s airways and there are other reasons too.

In my case, I have not noticed a significant difference in my energy level since starting to use the CPAP. This frustrates me, but I won’t quit. I will keep using my CPAP and I will keep trying to find answers and solutions to my fatigue. Why am I mentioning all this? I want you to be stubborn if you are tired. Keep working on answers. Maybe a CPAP is what will help you. Maybe something else will be helpful. Don’t quit.

There are also studies that talk about how the type of light before lights out may affect energy level and fatigue upon waking. I believe it is the bluish light that some studies say is the problem. Screen time including television, computers, phones and tablets may adversely impact sleep quality as well. I am going to read up on these studies and try a couple things — possibly going back to print media reading before bed and/or trying yellow/brownish tinted glasses over my readers if I am reading from a screen!

I also continue to hope that tweaking the CPAP will help me. I am trying to work on exercising and eating better, too. I guess I feel like I can constantly whine about and be frustrated by my fatigue or I can keep working on it. I choose to keep working toward a solution.

I am a survivor. We are survivors. So far, we are still here and still fighting. I am not a quitter and neither are you. Let’s continue to pursue our fatigue and press for solutions. The answers are out there and together we can find them! Please let me know what is working and not working for you if you, too, struggle with fatigue.
Report
Hall9000.1

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 16, 2015
For my Bladder C***** (I refuse to say the C word) Get a Vitamix for one and start eating as much raw fruits and vegetables- Blueberries are high in Resvertol along with other dark fruits. Yes, it's has allot of natural sugar but God made it that way. Stay away from red meat and pork- up your good proteins- Organic chicken and good fish- eat nuts like raw almonds and others. Stay away from processed foods and bad fat. Alkalize the body- water not all created = 7.5 or higher in PH look up your favorite brand and find out- add a ting bit of bicarbonate of soda to acidic water. Acidic body is a welcomed habitat for cancer. Eat things that are anti-inflammatory to the body- Take the wonder drug aspirin if you can. Exercise in a pool. Prayer and meditation and don't spend to much time on forums where people are all over the place with their emotions and many get offended and it get Cliquey. Back to getting rid of the negative thinking- Read things that make the mind think and grow- Love PS- I just got a CPAP after all these years can't comment on it yet but I read about it and might help my depression and sleepiness during the day. My machine is mouth and nose and I can adjust humidity. I will let you know how it works out. https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10208190546504360&id=291399344225362&comment_id=10208190656507110&reply_comment_id=10208190720708715&offset=0&total_comments=2¬if_t=share_comment
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Chemo Brain

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 16, 2015
Hi, I'm a NHFL survivor of 4yrs. Fatigue Is something I'm going to live with. I'm 50, as we age our body slows. Somethings are just part of life & the rest is up to us. If we eat right, exercise , drink plenty of water .... I know I'm not the same as I was before Cancer but I'm also older & menopausal lol. I take vitamins , I try to eat healthy & exercise from time to time . Oh, and try to find humor in everyday life. Good Remini for anything. 😁😘 Peace & Love❤️, Allison aka Chemo Brain
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kdboca

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 17, 2015
CPAP made a huge difference in my life. I stopped breathing 54 times an hour. I've been on CPAP for 10 years. I cannot even nap without it anymore. It improves my mental outlook and my awareness of what is happening around me. I am on 14cm pressure. When I go to bed I strap on the CPAP and I'm usually asleep within 2 minutes. I am a 9 year prostate cancer survivor, survived 5 years after a melanoma excision but just had a second, and currently am low risk smoldering myeloma.
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Karen melanoma survivour

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 17, 2015
I agree menopausal bodies also cause problems not sure how different I'd be if I hadn't had cancer as there aren't two of me one with and one without
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49er

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 17, 2015
Barbara, A reason you possibly still feel tired on pap therapy is it may not yet be optimized. Sleep doctors don't consider patients to be fully treated until their apnea index is less than 5. And many patients don't feel better until it reaches less than 2. For further assistance, you might want to visit cpaptalk.com which is a self help group of sleep apnea patients helping each other with various issues. There is no charge to join and it extremely helpful.
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BarbTako

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 18, 2015
This is great information. Thank you! www.cpaptalk.com!
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ChloeMica

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
November 22, 2015
I know little about the topic but I just really love your post here, especially those informative details. I have to learn your writing skill for my own papers. By the way, my paper is about creative peptides because I want to know its recent results in clinical trails. Any suggestions? I'll appreciate that.
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Angel

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
December 08, 2015
Great information. I like the one about what to do with the water.
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Kelley

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
December 09, 2015
I, too, have sever fatigue. I am a 3.5 year pancreatic cancer survivor and am currently NED. They doctors relate my tiredness to low iron, which is a result of mal-absorbtion of nutrients. No matter the amount of sleep I get, I could always use more. Like you, I get up every day and put one foot in front of the other. Really don't have a choice. Agree that fatigue is a huge problem with cancer patients.
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