Article Talk: Breast Cancer Survivor Sees Red Over Pink

Started by Paw Paw Marc, October 09, 2017
9 replies for this topic
Paw Paw Marc

Member
558 Posts
Posted on
October 09, 2017
Barbara, Thank you for emphasizing all survivors of any cancer. After four years of active treatment for NSCLC with mets to the brain and one adrenal gland and two years of NED, long-term and late side effects still dominate my life. God bless you!
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janr

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
I absolutely agree. I am a 20+ year survivor of NHL, stage IV B. When in conversation I mention I am a cancer survivor, eyes immediately move from my face to my chest, until I add what type I had. Early in my recovery I went to join an all night walk for cancer survivors. When I went to the table to sign in and told them I was a survivor, they specifically asked me if I was a breast cancer survivor. Only those got hats and T shirts and all the 'goodies.' I was appalled, and very embarrassed. We need to advocate for awareness of ALL cancers, and cures of ALL cancers. Thank you for writing and standing up for ALL survivors!!
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Thriver

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
As a sister breast cancer survivor i too struggle with the world turning pink in October for the same reasons you so eloquently describe in your article. So I have developed some coping strategies to get me through the month. First I decided to donate to my local cancer society that treats all forms of cancer instead of to a national breast cancer group. Then I joined and continue to support Breast Cancer Action, the Think Before You Pink organization which encourages consumers to ask critical questions before buying pink ribbon products and holds corporations accountable for pinkwashing. And finally since there are so few support groups for women with metastatic breast cancer I began facilitating such a group. These have helped me get through 16 pink Octobers and I hope you are able to find comparable strategies to assist you too.
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Sb4

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
Yes, thank you for your generous sentiment and caring for all afflicted. My wife recently died of ovarian cancer after fighting hard for 10 years (she is a rare example). Ovarian cancer is more rare than breast cancer but very hard to survive. I agree with your call for scaling up the research effort. I feel the trillions we have spent dubiously on anti-terrorism could have possibly saved so many more lives, including my wife's, if spent on cancer research. I remember we did feel in competition with the "pink" campaign for dollars (ovarian is "teal"), but I could not begrudge it, breast cancer touches so many women I understand the priority. I hope that the publicity from the pink campaign raises the issue for all cancers indirectly because it has the loudest voice. And I appreciate your voice in encouraging awareness of the urgency to fight all cancer types. We are on the cusp of such rapid understanding of the disease with the new molecular understanding and research tools, now is the time to push harder to save the lives of those brave souls who have been battling against time, hoping to see the light at the end of the tunnel. For all I know the next year may bring a treatment that could have saved my wife's life. I really want to see progress accelerate, all cancer patients deserve it so much.
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Fransw

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
Thank you Barb for writing this article. Every year in October products and advertising is overtaken by \"pink\". I am a 12 year Non-hogkins Lymphoma survivor. September is the Leukemia/Lymphoma Awareness month. How many people know this? While all cancer research needs to have funding to find cures, there is more to Cancer awareness then just Breast Cancer. I tend to shy away from the pink products. We need more awareness for all cancers.\r\n
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SeaSnork

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
I have heard from so many parents of children with cancer, just how much it hurts to see all the pink, especially during the month of September, which is Childhood Cancer Awareness month. In my area, Komen has breast cancer walks in September, instead of waiting until October. My cancer was uterine/endometrial and that is most often left out on drop down lists.. So I get to check "other". I am so thankful to have found my cancer so early and for 8 years since then, I have driven people with all types of cancer to treatment.
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LinnyM

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
Thank you so much for your article. You are so correct. On three separate occasions during my Rx, ( I was bald) I had women approach me with advice for dealing with my "breast cancer"!! Nice of them, but I did not have breast cancer. I am an RN, and sad to say even some of the nurses in the hospital where I worked did not know what NHL was. The public needs much more education on all cancers and funding. Thanks!
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RGW

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 09, 2017
Thank you for your article. I see pink and Blue ribbons. I will have to agree there needs to be more emphases put on the other cancers. I am a two year survivor of Mail Breast Cancer. Over 1/2 of my questions are answered with this is how we treat women, but there is not enough data for men to know for sure, so we recommend going along with normal procedures.
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tgili

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 11, 2017
Thank you thank you ! Agreed ! And my husband is a male Breast cancer patient now a metastatic Breast cancer patient. Much more research and awareness for male breast cancer and metastatic Breast cancer is definitely needed. Letís bring on the blue too
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Twinks

Member
0 Replies
Posted on
October 29, 2017
I feel the same way about all that pink. My feelings make me feel begrudging and selfish. But hey, I am a lung cancer survivor in 1996 and a uterine cancer survivor in 2014. Uterine cancer has a drab peach color. And I certainly think we need a very special color for the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy that many of us have to live with. I often tell my oncologist that if I knew the neuropathy would be so debilitating I would have taken my chances and skipped the chemo altogether. The doctor looks at me horrified and asks "Do you mean you would rather have passed?" I reply "Do I mean would I have rather died, yes".
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