Musa

Posting since January 01, 1970

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Posts I've Started
January 01, 1970

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Comments I've Made
Defiantly Alive
July 25, 2015
Susan, forgive me for nit-picking, but I'm a stickler for accurate statistics. So I hope you won't be annoyed with me for pointing that while an estimated 20-30% of patients diagnosed with Stage I-III breast cancer eventually develop metastatic (Stage IV) breast cancer, this doesn't mean they represent "30% of the breast cancer population" even when combined with the 6-8% of breast cancers diagnosed Stage IV from the start. Here's a more accurate way to think about prevalence of MBC within the larger BC population: from the NCI's SEER databases we know there are approximately 3 million US women alive today who have been diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives. An estimated 150,000 to 200,000 of these are women ...

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Defiantly Alive
July 25, 2015
Susan, the reason why the results from the 2008 study on mastectomy in stage IV breast cancer are contradictory to the findings in the studies presented in San Antonio into 2013 has to do with the quality of the research. The 2008 study was observational, meaning that they simply looked at the differences in outcomes of women who chose mastectomy versus those who did not. This shows in association, but cannot show causation, because other sources of bias info wincing outcome could have entered into the choice for mastectomy that patients made, such as less extensive metastatic disease, better access to care, etc. The 2013 studies on the other hand (and I believe there were two not one) were randomizedcontrolled trials, in ...

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Defiantly Alive
July 25, 2015
Susan, the reason why the results from the 2008 study on mastectomy in stage IV breast cancer are contradictory to the findings in the studies presented in San Antonio into 2013 has to do with the quality of the research. The 2008 study was observational, meaning that they simply looked at the differences in outcomes of women who chose mastectomy versus those who did not. This shows in association, but cannot show causation, because other sources of bias info wincing outcome could have entered into the choice for mastectomy that patients made, such as less extensive metastatic disease, better access to care, etc. The 2013 studies on the other hand (and I believe there were two not one) were randomizedcontrolled trials, in ...

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