Article Talk: Ovarian Cancer Recurrence: Discussion With an Expert

Started by sal, November 09, 2016
1 reply for this topic
sal

Member
558 Posts
Posted on
November 09, 2016
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We cannot discount the role of food in fighting off cancer. I was diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer in 2007. (Dr. Richards was on the team--he is wonderful!) I like to say that surgery and chemotherapy put me into remission and that changing my lifestyle has helped me stay that way 9 years later. After much reading and educating, I adopted a whole food, plant-based diet consisting of an array of grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes. I urge other survivors to check out the many resources, such as PCRM's Cancer Project: http://www.pcrm.org/health/cancer-resources/the-cancer-project. There is substantial evidence that eating a plant-centered diet, low in fat, sugars & processed food, helps the body fight cancer. I'll gladly provide other resources and information.
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Sb4

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Posted on
October 25, 2017
I agree, diet may be a significant factor in going the distance, even if it extends life a small amount. This is a new era where the new lifesaving treatment may be months away, so extending survival is more than just adding some time to your life, it may open the door to a much longer time here on earth. Taking on a healthy diet also creates a positive commitment to yourself and a reminder to yourself that you want to participate in fighting the disease, which may unleash some natural healing powers in your mind and body I believe. It also can take your mind off of feeling helpless and replace it with a sense that you do have some control and power over your life. But I understand people must decide what really makes life worth living, even if shorter. If it is cigarettes and junk food, I can't argue with their choice. My wife survived ovarian cancer for 10 years, considered beyond expectations, as I mention in many of my posts. We worked on diet and any other little thing that had a chance of helping so long as her doctor said it couldn't hurt. Longvida curcumin was tried, ketogenic diet (may have added to her survival but not at all practical and maybe not healthy long term), ginger, etc. She walked/hiked up to 6 to 9 miles a day and that may have been the most important contribution to her longevity. She did have an amazing attitude; I know it wouldn't be fair to ask everyone to have the same amount of courage and determination, we are who we are. I tried to keep up with research articles for any clues that might be helpful. I think ovarian cancer patients should research and ask their doctors about the following medications that may extend survival: 1. low-dose Metformin. My wife took low dose Metformin for most of the time (she was pre-diabetic anyway, so no conflict there), and there is research that indicates that may help, with other cancers too. (Just don't take it if you have hepatocellular carcinoma and are taking sorafenib treatments according to recent study). This may tie in with theories that insulin and sugar may fuel cancers. 2. low-dose COX-2 inhibitors - there are some studies that indicated this anti-inflammatory drug may help in various ways, possibly helping the immune system fight the cancer. 3. low-dose Non-specific Beta Blockers - there was a study that showed that ovarian cancer patients on these medications had longer survival, but the study quality was poor (according to her doctor), I think a retrospective study. However, I have seen recent studies that have elucidated how the nervous system participates in tumor growth and metastasis and that Beta Blockers could interfere with that process. If a low-dose would not be harmful, it may be something worth considering. Of course all drugs have some side effects and that has to be carefully discussed and monitored and dose adjusted. However, if the side effect of not taking the drugs is the patient does not survive long enough to enjoy the new treatments on the horizon, then the battle is lost. It is a gamble each patient must consider. If I were an ovarian cancer survivor of 5 years having used up platinum and doxil treatments, I would seriously consider adding these drugs to my maintenance regimen if the side effects were not noticeable and I did not have other conditions that would contraindicate them. I wonder if my wife would be here today if she had been on a COX-2 inhibitor and Beta Blocker that could have prevented or delayed certain metastases. -SB
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