http://www.curetoday.com/community/justin-birckbichler/2018/06/78-percent-of-men-were-not-taught-how-to-do-a-testicular-self-exam-at-most-recent-physical
78 Percent of Men Were Not Taught How to Do a Testicular Self Exam at Most Recent Physical

Justin Birckbichler

I Asked 550 Men, "Do Testicular Exams Happen at Your Annual Physical?" Survey Says...

About 51 percent of men said their doctor physically examined their testicles, while 42 percent said they did not have an exam done, and seven percent could not remember. (I feel like this is something most people would remember, but hey - to each their own.)

While those figures are dismal, responses to the next two survey questions get worse. 78 percent of men reported that their doctor did not teach them how to do a testicular self-exam, and six percent said that they didn't remember, which is effectively a no in my book. Similarly, only 11 percent said their doctor told them how frequently to do a self-exam.

Of the 550 respondents, 87 percent of the men were in the 15-50 years old range. This is great, since 50 percent of testicular cancer cases occur in men ages 15-44. The remaining 13 percent were either above 51 or below 14.

In the survey, there was an optional, open-ended section where people could share their own comments. These were some of the more interesting ones:

For a full breakdown (including each question by age range which shows a trend of less positive results as men age) and further analysis, click here to view more information.

To learn more about the development and backstory to why I did this study, check out this piece I wrote for CURE. For more information on administering the survey, check out this piece on A Ballsy Sense of Tumor.

How to advocate for testicular exams and testicular health as a patient

When you're at your next physical, ask for a testicular exam. Be outright pushy about it if you need to - after all, you're probably paying a copay and/or insurance premiums; you might as well get your full money's worth. Ask that the doctor performs testicular exams on all of his or her male patients. No man is immune from developing testicular cancer.

If you're unsure about how to do a self-exam, ask your doctor (or check out ABSOT's self-exam page). Encourage them to discuss it with all men. Share this blog post and results of the study with them.

Be sure to tell your friends, brothers, fathers, and other assorted cast of male characters in your life about this. If doctors and others begin hearing the importance of testicular exams more often, it'll become second nature to dedicate a decent amount of time to this vital task instead of treating it like a checklist item to gloss over.

There's another area of focus to consider here.

One thing that always shocked me was when men apologized to me for answering no to any of the questions about doctors physically examining testicles or discussing the proper technique for self-exams and how often they should be performed.

In this study, the only question that respondents have control over is when they most recently attended a physical. 68 percent of men had attended a physical in the past year, showing an eight percent increase compared to findings from a 2016 Cleveland Clinic study. Answering no to any other question is something that lies in the hands of the doctor (or, as in the case of roughly half of the respondents, does not lie in the hands of a doctor).

Beyond sharing with guys who are at risk for testicular cancer, this information needs to get into the hands of medical professionals as well. Now that this study is complete, I plan to reach out to doctors/medical students to share my findings, ask them to change these points, and help spread the practice as widely as possible. Now that we've cracked open this nut of an investigation, the ball is in your court.

All information was aggregated and rounded to the nearest whole percentage, which may account for any slight discrepancies in adding up to 100 percent. For a sample size of 550, it is to be expected that there is a margin of error in the 4.5% range. This study was not reviewed by an IRB and should not be considered a formal research study. Since this study was based on men's recall, there may be some inaccuracies in what occurred versus what was remembered.

Print | cure Printing...