Doctor, What Should I Do?
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Web Exclusive: Corporations Unite Against Cancer
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: What Parents Can Do
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: A Lion in the House
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Multiple Myeloma & Leukemia
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Coping
September 27, 2006 – Christopher Schultz
Legal Rights as a Survivor
September 27, 2006
Bookshelf
September 27, 2006 – Kathy LaTour
House Call
September 27, 2006 – Aman Buzdar
Mitigating Litigation
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cancer with a Known Cause
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cure Becomes Less Risky
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Classifying & Clarifying MDS
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
When the Choice Is Not Cure
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
The Scoring System
September 27, 2006
Do Women Under 50 Need Mammograms?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Watch It or Treat It?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Sisterhood
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Creating a Dragon Boat Team
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Arms in Motion
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Job-Searching Hints for Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Working Through Caregiver Grief
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Fatal Fibers
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
People & Places
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Back in Action After DCIS
September 27, 2006 – Nancy Reuben Greenfield
Getting the Care You Deserve
September 27, 2006 – Stacy Beller Stryer
Treatment Boost for MDS
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Power to the Patient
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
In Situ Breast Cancer: Is It Really Cancer?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
The Shadow Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Taming the Dragon
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
The Choice to Work
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Waste of Taste
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Cunning Predator
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
Lessons Learned
September 27, 2006 – Cole A. Giller, MD PhD
Letters from Our Readers
September 27, 2006
A Worry-Free Way to Support Nonprofits?
September 27, 2006 – Emma Johnson
Message from the Editor
September 27, 2006
Doctor, What Should I Do?
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Web Exclusive: Corporations Unite Against Cancer
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: What Parents Can Do
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: A Lion in the House
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Multiple Myeloma & Leukemia
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Coping
September 27, 2006 – Christopher Schultz
Legal Rights as a Survivor
September 27, 2006
Bookshelf
September 27, 2006 – Kathy LaTour
House Call
September 27, 2006 – Aman Buzdar
Mitigating Litigation
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cancer with a Known Cause
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Currently Viewing
Cure Becomes Less Risky
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
When the Choice Is Not Cure
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
The Scoring System
September 27, 2006
Do Women Under 50 Need Mammograms?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Watch It or Treat It?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Sisterhood
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Creating a Dragon Boat Team
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Arms in Motion
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Job-Searching Hints for Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Working Through Caregiver Grief
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Fatal Fibers
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
People & Places
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Back in Action After DCIS
September 27, 2006 – Nancy Reuben Greenfield
Getting the Care You Deserve
September 27, 2006 – Stacy Beller Stryer
Treatment Boost for MDS
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Power to the Patient
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
In Situ Breast Cancer: Is It Really Cancer?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
The Shadow Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Taming the Dragon
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
The Choice to Work
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Waste of Taste
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Cunning Predator
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
Lessons Learned
September 27, 2006 – Cole A. Giller, MD PhD
Letters from Our Readers
September 27, 2006
A Worry-Free Way to Support Nonprofits?
September 27, 2006 – Emma Johnson
Message from the Editor
September 27, 2006

Cure Becomes Less Risky

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation and improvements in conditioning treatments may make transplant available to more patients and lower risk of severe side effects.

BY Alice McCarthy
PUBLISHED September 27, 2006

About half of MDS patients are cured after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, a procedure where blood stem cells from a donor replace abnormal stem cells and produce the needed healthy blood cells. But serious side effects from the procedure and donor availability restrict many patients from taking this treatment route.

Side effects from the intense chemotherapy and/or total body radiation prior to transplant, known as conditioning treatment, may pose a problem, while the risk of graft-versus-host disease, where the new donor cells recognize the patient’s existing cells as foreign, creates a post-transplant problem. Stem cells nearly identical to the patient, whether from a sibling or matched unrelated donor, provide the best probability of success. Because matched donors are difficult to find—less than a quarter of patients eligible for a stem cell transplant have matched sibling donors—research continues for other methods.

Recent improvements in conditioning treatments may make transplant available to more patients. Using lower doses of chemotherapy or radiation, sometimes called a minitransplant, gives the opportunity for a transplant to older patients, who without treatment would have an average survival time of less than 18 months.

Stem cell transplant is used to treat people with intermediate-1, intermediate-2 and high-risk MDS. The age limit, previously 55, is reaching about 65—and even higher in select cases—because patients aren’t suffering problems previously encountered with the higher-intensity conventional transplants.

Worldwide databases have registered more than six million unmatched donors, and new techniques are allowing better matching between donor and patient and reducing mortality and the incidence of graft-versus-host disease. 

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