Doctor, What Should I Do?
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Web Exclusive: Corporations Unite Against Cancer
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: What Parents Can Do
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: A Lion in the House
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Multiple Myeloma & Leukemia
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Coping
September 27, 2006 – Christopher Schultz
Legal Rights as a Survivor
September 27, 2006
Bookshelf
September 27, 2006 – Kathy LaTour
House Call
September 27, 2006 – Aman Buzdar
Mitigating Litigation
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cancer with a Known Cause
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cure Becomes Less Risky
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Classifying & Clarifying MDS
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
When the Choice Is Not Cure
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
The Scoring System
September 27, 2006
Do Women Under 50 Need Mammograms?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Watch It or Treat It?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Sisterhood
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Creating a Dragon Boat Team
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Arms in Motion
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Job-Searching Hints for Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Working Through Caregiver Grief
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Fatal Fibers
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
People & Places
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Back in Action After DCIS
September 27, 2006 – Nancy Reuben Greenfield
Getting the Care You Deserve
September 27, 2006 – Stacy Beller Stryer
Treatment Boost for MDS
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Power to the Patient
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
In Situ Breast Cancer: Is It Really Cancer?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
The Shadow Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Taming the Dragon
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
The Choice to Work
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Waste of Taste
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Cunning Predator
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
Lessons Learned
September 27, 2006 – Cole A. Giller, MD PhD
Letters from Our Readers
September 27, 2006
A Worry-Free Way to Support Nonprofits?
September 27, 2006 – Emma Johnson
Message from the Editor
September 27, 2006
Doctor, What Should I Do?
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Web Exclusive: Corporations Unite Against Cancer
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: What Parents Can Do
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: A Lion in the House
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
Multiple Myeloma & Leukemia
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Coping
September 27, 2006 – Christopher Schultz
Legal Rights as a Survivor
September 27, 2006
Bookshelf
September 27, 2006 – Kathy LaTour
House Call
September 27, 2006 – Aman Buzdar
Mitigating Litigation
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cancer with a Known Cause
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Cure Becomes Less Risky
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Classifying & Clarifying MDS
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
When the Choice Is Not Cure
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
The Scoring System
September 27, 2006
Do Women Under 50 Need Mammograms?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Watch It or Treat It?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
Sisterhood
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Creating a Dragon Boat Team
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Arms in Motion
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Job-Searching Hints for Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Working Through Caregiver Grief
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Fatal Fibers
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
People & Places
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
Back in Action After DCIS
September 27, 2006 – Nancy Reuben Greenfield
Getting the Care You Deserve
September 27, 2006 – Stacy Beller Stryer
Treatment Boost for MDS
September 27, 2006 – Alice McCarthy
Power to the Patient
September 27, 2006 – Marc Silver
In Situ Breast Cancer: Is It Really Cancer?
September 27, 2006 – Beverly A. Caley
The Shadow Survivors
September 27, 2006 – Jo Cavallo
Taming the Dragon
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
The Choice to Work
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Waste of Taste
September 27, 2006 – Elizabeth Whittington
A Cunning Predator
September 27, 2006 – Katy Human
Lessons Learned
September 27, 2006 – Cole A. Giller, MD PhD
Letters from Our Readers
September 27, 2006
A Worry-Free Way to Support Nonprofits?
September 27, 2006 – Emma Johnson
Currently Viewing
Message from the Editor
September 27, 2006

Message from the Editor

Making medical decisions grants patients power—and uncertainty.

PUBLISHED September 27, 2006

Unlike previous generations—when patients, for the most part, passively nodded while listening to their doctors pick a battle plan—patients today are more informed, involved and in charge of treatment selections. Of course, with that empowerment comes the stress of making what everyone hopes will be a life-saving decision. That’s where we hope CURE comes in—to give you a better understanding of the situation you’re now facing.

When we first decided to do an article on decision-making, it became a matter of figuring out what we wanted to convey to the reader—telling you what to do wasn’t the point. Like the headline says, it’s more about making clear that you decide the course of action. The path should be about whatever works for you, whether it’s making a choice autonomously or simply trusting the person in the white coat. The theme of medical decision-making carries over into our cover story “In Situ Breast Cancer: Is It Really Cancer?” by Beverly A. Caley. I hope these articles help you see how others came to their treatment decisions, and maybe even give you a little guidance.

Speaking of breast cancer—yes, we’re doing another feature on the disease. Based on the letters and phone calls we often receive, this probably doesn’t sit well with some of you with rarer or less-publicized tumor types. And, truthfully, I can’t say I blame you. My own family has been affected by pancreatic cancer and cancer of unknown primary, so I know there are plenty of other tumor types that deserve a share of the spotlight. At CURE, we don’t feel that any single cancer deserves more attention or more pages in our magazine. Veteran readers know that we’ve featured less-common cancers like kidney cancer (Spring 2006), head and neck cancer (Fall 2005) and numerous others (back issues are available here). We even have a feature on myelodysplastic syndromes in this issue and a bladder cancer spread in the works for our next issue. So while more than a third of our readers are breast cancer patients and survivors, we don’t feel any less loyalty to the 8 percent of lymphoma readers or, say, the 4 percent with ovarian cancer.

But we know we can and should be doing more for you. If you’re reading this magazine, you’re most likely among the 1.4 million patients who will be diagnosed this year or are one of the 10 million survivors living in the United States. That’s a big target audience—too big for our liking, in fact. But isn’t that why we’re here in the first place?

Melissa Weber
Editorial Director & Managing Editor

Ever since I joined CURE shortly after the first issue launched in 2002, I’ve received thousands of e-mails from readers on a variety of topics. Many, as you might imagine, are medical questions about treatment options: Which chemotherapy drug would be most effective against my tumor? Is surgery the best option? Should I enter a clinical trial? Since choosing a treatment is the most crucial decision when it comes to fighting cancer, I’m always glad to see a newly diagnosed reader take the proactive step of hunting down advice. But as writer Marc Silver explains in “Power to the Patient”, advice is just that—while often helpful, it seldom eases the uncertainty when patients find themselves at this critical crossroad.

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