The HPV Debate
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Patient Congress
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
New Role for Dempsey; Rest in Peace, Molly
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Evista vs. Femara in Breast Cancer
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Q&A: Functional Imaging
March 16, 2007 – Anna D. Barker, PhD
Survivors at Risk for Cognitive Dysfunction
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Stowe, Vermont
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
www.komen.org
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Help Me Live: 20 Things People with Cancer Want You To Know
March 16, 2007 – Kathy LaTour
Having a Ball
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Message from the Editor
March 16, 2007 – Melissa Weber
Currently Viewing
Letters from Our Readers
March 16, 2007
Deadly Accuracy
March 16, 2007 – Katy Human
The Weight Gain Mystery
March 16, 2007 – Noble Sprayberry
Hazardous to Your Heart
March 16, 2007 – Jamie Spencer
What Five Years Really Means
March 16, 2007 – Curtis Pesmen
Prescription for Trouble
March 16, 2007 – Jo Cavallo
Report Incites Controversy After Breast Cancer Decline Linked to HRT Use
March 16, 2007 – Emma Johnson
Liver Cancer: More Cases, More Causes
March 16, 2007 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
Men Behaving Boldly
March 16, 2007 – Marc Silver
The Age Factor
March 16, 2007 – Charlotte Huff
What Really Helps
March 16, 2007 – Lori Hope
Physical Activity and the Cancer Patient
March 16, 2007 – The American Cancer Society
The National Cancer Institute's CAM Agenda
March 16, 2007 – Jeffrey D. White, MD
Targeted Strike
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Heart Health for Childhood Cancer Patients
March 16, 2007 – Jamie Spencer
Making Lemons into Champagne
March 16, 2007 – Kathy LaTour
Clearing the Five-Year Insurance Hurdle
March 16, 2007 – Curtis Pesmen
Resources: Guys with Gumption
March 16, 2007 – Marc Silver
Medical Miracle or Spontaneous Remission?
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
An Integrative Plan
March 16, 2007 – Jo Cavallo
Dangerous Exposure
March 16, 2007 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
The Emotional Toll
March 16, 2007 – Charlotte Huff
Help for the Older Patient
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: Protection from Health Fraud
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
Web Exclusive: Can Liver Cancer Be Found Early?
March 16, 2007 – The American Cancer Society
Web Exclusive: The Biology of Cancer and Aging
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington
What is a Proton?
March 16, 2007 – Katy Human
Guys with Gumption
March 16, 2007 – Marc Silver
A History of Alternative Cancer Cures
March 16, 2007
Liver Cancer: A Global Epidemic
March 16, 2007
Breast Cancer & Liver Cancer
March 16, 2007 – Elizabeth Whittington

Letters from Our Readers

Readers respond to past CURE articles on living with mesothelioma, hospice, beating bladder cancer, lung cancer, and response to CURE's 2007 Cancer Resource Guide.

PUBLISHED March 16, 2007
. . . . .

What a wonderful idea! As an 11-year breast cancer survivor, I know so many newly diagnosed cancer patients can benefit from such a publication. Kudos to you for your efforts!

Marilyn McWilliams
Portland, Ore.

. . . . .
I just received the new 2007 Cancer Resource Guide and love the size. I hope this is the size for every issue from now on. I want to thank you for your magazine. I have read it ever since my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. You do a great job informing many about this dreaded disease. Hopefully, soon, there will be cures.

Carole Bretscher
Bellbrook, Ohio

Our regular quarterly issues will continue to be the larger size, but our aim with the smaller size of the guide was to give readers a handy, user-friendly publication that could be easily carried to doctors’ appointments or support group meetings—maybe even added to your book collection. But however and wherever it’s used, we wanted the guide to be functional, so thanks for letting us know it was successful. —Editors

. . . . .
I am a five-year breast cancer survivor and a 10-year colon cancer survivor, and always look forward to your publication. The content is so cutting edge, yet written in such an understandable way for those of us that are only in the medical field by way of experience. The Cancer Resource Guide was especially well rounded. There was something for everyone no matter what the stage of treatment. I needed to quickly finish the issue, as a friend was just diagnosed with breast cancer this past week. From the first few pages of the resource guide, I knew that it was the perfect reference for her.

Judy Nachowitz
Ridgefield, Conn.

. . . . .
Being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and thyroid cancer in 2006, I have gone through treatment for both and some pretty rough times. I discovered CURE at one of my follow-up mammograms, took advantage of the free subscription and have since read every issue. I have learned something from every issue and the online information. I just finished reading the Cancer Resource Guide from cover to cover and have to compliment you on this issue. It was not only full of great articles but all were easy to understand.

Barbara Runyon
Yorkville, Ill.

. . . . .

I am grateful for your efforts in helping to raise awareness of mesothelioma in the Fall 2006 issue, and of the efforts researchers are making to find treatments and ultimately a cure for this asbestos-related cancer. Because mesothelioma has been considered a rare cancer, it is imperative that patients find the information they need to give them hope and treatment options from experts in the field. I was diagnosed four years ago and have participated in three clinical trials to date. I credit those novel treatments from informed physicians with the good quality of life I enjoy today. To this end, I urge you to add information about the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (www.marf.org) to the Toolbox section of your 2008 Cancer Resource Guide.

Mary Cosentino
Western Springs, Ill.

Due to space constraints, we were unable to include all of our Toolbox resources in the 2007 Cancer Resource Guide. —Editors

. . . . .

My mom was diagnosed with stage 3 lung cancer in March 2003. She had a good summer but then had to have hospice care in her home. She had this nurse whom I call an angel of mercy who helped me through my mother’s journey with death. Without her, I don’t think I could have let myself accept my mother’s death. Your article “A Different Kind of Caring” in the Winter issue brought back so many memories, good ones along with the sad ones. This article hit right on the head—hospice nurses are such unique people!

Rhonda Fischer
Butte, Neb.

. . . . .

Your Winter issue article “Bladder Cancer: Breaking the Research Bbarrier” is informative and helpful, even to those of us who have already been “down that road” with the disease. There are so few ways for the public to learn and understand what this disease involves. I am most appreciative of your concern to educate the public about this ongoing and increasing problem for cancer treatment.

Ruth Mary Pollack
New Hampton, N.H.

. . . . .
When I was first diagnosed in the fall of 2003 with advanced bladder cancer, I could find little help out there to allay my fears or to assist me in determining treatment options. In order to take an active role in their own health care, people need to be informed of the symptoms of bladder cancer and all the tests available to them. More articles on bladder cancer will surely encourage more funding for better treatments and more research to establish causes, and subsequently, a cure. It is time for the general public to become aware that lives are at risk because of the lack of information. I look forward to many more articles on this subject.

Karen Godfrey
Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network volunteer
Estero, Fla.

. . . . .

Although CURE highlights encouraging gains in other major cancers, the news for lung cancer continues to be grim. Lung cancer’s dismal 15 percent five-year survival rate stands in sharp contrast to 86 percent and 99 percent for breast and prostate cancers, respectively. Ironically, early detection is cited as a critical factor in reducing cancer mortality rates, yet is not widely endorsed for the cancer responsible for nearly one-third of all cancer deaths. The overwhelming success of the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program, led by Dr. Claudia Henschke, clearly demonstrates that early detection is possible and meets standards equivalent to or better than those currently in place for other cancers. To delay implementation of a screening protocol for a high-risk population is unacceptable. Public and private entities must work together to reverse the decades of stigma and neglect too long attached to lung cancer. Then we will all finally have progress worth celebrating.

Joyce Neifert
Co-chair, Lung Cancer Alliance of California
Sebastopol, Calif.

. . . . .
Corrections In the 2007 Cancer Resource Guide, the contact numbers for the Melanoma International Foundation and the Esophageal Cancer Awareness Association were listed incorrectly in Toolbox: Resources to Use. The correct numbers are 866-463-6663 and 866-370-3222, respectively. CURE regrets the errors.


We love to hear what you think about the stories in CURE. Address comments to editor@curetoday.com. Letters are published at the editor’s discretion and may be edited for length and grammar. If you prefer your letter not be published, please indicate.

And don’t forget we are always looking for personal experience writing from our readers. Send your stories about cancer and its impact on your life to editor@curetoday.com. Keep it to 1,000 words please.

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