Letters from Our Readers
September 08, 2008
Web Exclusive: For the Caregiver: How to Make the Adjustment Post-Treatment
September 08, 2008 – Charlotte Huff
Defeating Fear: Strategic Moves
September 08, 2008 – Paul Engstrom
Scott's Denial
September 08, 2008 – Tara Beers Gibson, PhD
Planning for Survivorship
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
Re-Entry: Age & Gender
September 08, 2008 – Charlotte Huff
Web Exclusive: How to Manage Side Effects
September 08, 2008
Web Exclusive: Preventing Breast Cancer
September 08, 2008
Breaking Down TCM
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
When Patients Don't Want to Know
September 08, 2008 – Joanne Kenen
Survivors Celebrate and Stroll
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
Active Recovery
September 08, 2008 – Don Vaughan
Challenges in Cancer Survivorship
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
Back to 'Normal'
September 08, 2008 – Charlotte Huff
Web Exclusive: Questions to Ask Your Doctor
September 08, 2008
What's the Right Decision?
September 08, 2008 – Jeffrey Belkora, PhD
Multiple Myeloma & Thrombocytopenia
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
The Last Tenth
September 08, 2008 – Jen Hoffmann
Keep It Moving
September 08, 2008 – Lacey Meyer
Glossary: Making Sense of the Jargon
September 08, 2008 – Katy Human
Surgery & Radiation: New Options, New Questions
September 08, 2008 – Katy Human
To Take or Not to Take
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
Finding Your Compass
September 08, 2008 – Katy Human
Pretty Is What Changes
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
Dana Farber's Survivorship Clinic
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Programs to Help People Quit Smoking Miss Minorities
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
New Funding and a New Voice
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Advocating for Others
September 08, 2008 – Lacey Meyer
Never Fear
September 08, 2008 – Paul Engstrom
Q&A: Vitamin D
September 08, 2008 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
www.SharingHope.tv
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
New Pharmacy Breed Offers Special Attention, Drawbacks to Patients
September 08, 2008 – Jessica Wapner
Olympian Postpones Treatment to Compete
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
International Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Conference
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Understanding Preventive Mastectomy
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
New Law Prevents Genetic Discrimination
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
East Meets West
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
Facing A Legacy
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
What to Know Before You Go
September 08, 2008 – Susan Kreimer
Far From Home
September 08, 2008 – Susan Kreimer
Message from the CURE Staff
September 08, 2008 – The CURE Team
Letters from Our Readers
September 08, 2008
Web Exclusive: For the Caregiver: How to Make the Adjustment Post-Treatment
September 08, 2008 – Charlotte Huff
Defeating Fear: Strategic Moves
September 08, 2008 – Paul Engstrom
Scott's Denial
September 08, 2008 – Tara Beers Gibson, PhD
Planning for Survivorship
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
Re-Entry: Age & Gender
September 08, 2008 – Charlotte Huff
Web Exclusive: How to Manage Side Effects
September 08, 2008
Web Exclusive: Preventing Breast Cancer
September 08, 2008
Breaking Down TCM
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
When Patients Don't Want to Know
September 08, 2008 – Joanne Kenen
Survivors Celebrate and Stroll
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
Active Recovery
September 08, 2008 – Don Vaughan
Challenges in Cancer Survivorship
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
Back to 'Normal'
September 08, 2008 – Charlotte Huff
Web Exclusive: Questions to Ask Your Doctor
September 08, 2008
What's the Right Decision?
September 08, 2008 – Jeffrey Belkora, PhD
Currently Viewing
Multiple Myeloma & Thrombocytopenia
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Keep It Moving
September 08, 2008 – Lacey Meyer
Glossary: Making Sense of the Jargon
September 08, 2008 – Katy Human
Surgery & Radiation: New Options, New Questions
September 08, 2008 – Katy Human
To Take or Not to Take
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
Finding Your Compass
September 08, 2008 – Katy Human
Pretty Is What Changes
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
Dana Farber's Survivorship Clinic
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Programs to Help People Quit Smoking Miss Minorities
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
New Funding and a New Voice
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Advocating for Others
September 08, 2008 – Lacey Meyer
Never Fear
September 08, 2008 – Paul Engstrom
Q&A: Vitamin D
September 08, 2008 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
www.SharingHope.tv
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
New Pharmacy Breed Offers Special Attention, Drawbacks to Patients
September 08, 2008 – Jessica Wapner
Olympian Postpones Treatment to Compete
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
International Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Conference
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
Understanding Preventive Mastectomy
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
New Law Prevents Genetic Discrimination
September 08, 2008 – Elizabeth Whittington
East Meets West
September 08, 2008 – Lena Huang
Facing A Legacy
September 08, 2008 – Kathy LaTour
What to Know Before You Go
September 08, 2008 – Susan Kreimer
Far From Home
September 08, 2008 – Susan Kreimer
Message from the CURE Staff
September 08, 2008 – The CURE Team

Multiple Myeloma & Thrombocytopenia

Velcade is now available for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients and new drugs emerge as potential treatment to a serious side effect. 

BY Elizabeth Whittington
PUBLISHED September 08, 2008

Data from the VISTA trial were originally presented at last year’s American Society of Hematology meeting, but the FDA made its decision using updated data. Velcade, when combined with other forms of chemotherapy and administered before a stem cell transplant, is also yielding good results, according to additional studies in newly diagnosed patients. Common side effects of Velcade include neutropenia (low white blood cell count), nausea, fatigue, and peripheral neuropathy.

Velcade, also approved for mantle cell lymphoma, is a proteasome inhibitor that works by blocking enzymes that affect cell growth and survival. Myeloma is the second most common blood cancer, affecting nearly 20,000 Americans each year. The disease results when abnormal plasma cells (white blood cells that make antibodies) develop in the bone marrow and begin multiplying, crowding out normal blood cells. For more on Velcade, go to www.velcade.com.

Patients with thrombocytopenia have low levels of blood-clotting platelets, leaving them vulnerable to life-threatening bleeding. Thrombocytopenia can be caused by cancer, its treatment, or a disorder called immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), which is characterized by small, numerous bruises (called purpura) that appear on the skin and signal broken blood vessels.

ITP is primarily caused by the body’s immune system attacking mature platelets or the cells that produce platelets. The disease can also appear in patients with certain blood cancers or graft-versus-host disease (when the donor immune cells view the recipient’s body as foreign following an allogeneic stem cell transplant).

Two drugs were recently submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for approval to treat chronic ITP—when the disease lasts longer than six months. Nplate (romiplostim) and Promacta (eltrombopag) both stimulate the production of platelet cells.

Nplate’s approval on August 22 was based on two phase III trials published earlier this year in the Lancet that showed the agent allowed patients to discontinue or reduce other ITP medications, as well as offered a longer response and reduced the rate of significant bleeding events.

Promacta was granted priority review in March, and if approved, will be available in September. The FDA reviewed data from an international phase III study that showed Promacta, given as a daily pill for up to six weeks, increased platelet counts to a safe level in 59 percent of patients compared with 16 percent taking a placebo.

While ITP is rare in most cancer patients, the approvals may lead to the drugs being used for thrombocytopenia caused by cancer or chemotherapy.

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