Qigong could reduce depression in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiation
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Optimizing the Options When You're Uninsured
March 14, 2013
Let Go & Go On
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Making a Difference
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March 14, 2013 – The American Cancer Society
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Weighing the Consequences
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Do Two Bads Equal One Good?
March 13, 2013 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act Becomes Law
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Dr. Lacouture's Skin Care Guide for People Living with Cancer
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National Women's Survivors Convention
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The Ups and Downs of Cancer Deaths
March 13, 2013 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
Stars Team Up to Help Young Cancer Patient
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Research Updates
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Planning for an Unpredictable Cancer
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Letters from Our Readers
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How Caregivers Adjust to Post-Cancer Life
March 14, 2013 – Jane Hill
Donating the Gift of Life
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Knowing Your Healthcare Team
March 11, 2013 – Maureen Salamon
When Cancer is Incurable
March 13, 2013 – Katy Human
Risk Management: Living in the Past, Present and Future with Genetic Risk
March 13, 2013 – Kathy LaTour
Combining Radiation and Chemotherapy May Improve Outcomes
March 13, 2013 – Roxanne Nelson
Group Therapy: Treatment Advances in Sarcoma
March 13, 2013 – Heather L. Van Epps, PhD
Qigong could reduce depression in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiation
April 30, 2013 – Elizabeth Whittington
Optimizing the Options When You're Uninsured
March 14, 2013
Let Go & Go On
March 14, 2013 – Jane Hill
Making a Difference
March 14, 2013 – Laura Beil
Can a Human Gene be Patented?
March 13, 2013 – Kathy LaTour
Changes in Other Genes
March 14, 2013 – The American Cancer Society
Lynch Syndrome
March 14, 2013 – Kathy LaTour
Coffee's Hidden Cancer Fighters
March 14, 2013 – Michael Darling
Preparing for Chemoradiotherapy
March 14, 2013 – Roxanne Nelson
Sarcoma in the Young
March 14, 2013 – Heather L. Van Epps, PhD
ACS Proposes New Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines
March 13, 2013 – Susan Jenks
Meet the Team
March 14, 2013 – Maureen Salamon
Weighing the Consequences
March 14, 2013 – Fran DiGiacomo
Managing Cancer-Related Fatigue
March 12, 2013 – Barbara Sadick
Do Two Bads Equal One Good?
March 13, 2013 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act Becomes Law
March 14, 2013 – Lena Huang
Dr. Lacouture's Skin Care Guide for People Living with Cancer
March 14, 2013 – Katherine Lagomarsino
National Women's Survivors Convention
March 14, 2013 – Jon Garinn
Tool Helps Users Prepare for End-of-Life Discussion
March 14, 2013 – Jon Garinn
The Ups and Downs of Cancer Deaths
March 13, 2013 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
Stars Team Up to Help Young Cancer Patient
March 14, 2013 – Lindsay Ray
Research Updates
March 14, 2013 – Elizabeth Whittington
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When Cancer is Incurable
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Risk Management: Living in the Past, Present and Future with Genetic Risk
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Pipeline

The latest in cancer prevention, diagnosis & treatment.

BY Lindsay Ray
PUBLISHED March 14, 2013

On Feb. 22, Kadcyla (ado-trastuzumab emtansine or T-DM1) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat patients with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer. An antibody-drug conjugate, Kadcyla fuses the chemotherapy drug emtansine to the antibody Herceptin (trastuzumab) to target HER2 receptors on cancer cells. The approval was based on results from the phase 3 EMILIA trial, which enrolled 991 patients who had previously been treated with Herceptin and a taxane-based chemotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned to either receive Kadcyla or the current standard—a combination of Xeloda (capecitabine) and Tykerb (lapatinib). Those in the Kadcyla arm had a median overall survival of 30.9 months compared with 25.1 months for those in the combination arm.

Side effects included low platelet count, vomiting, diarrhea and hand-foot syndrome. For details, visit kadcyla.com or call 877-436-3683.

The FDA approved Pomalyst (pomalidomide) on Feb. 8 to treat patients with multiple myeloma whose disease has progressed during or within 60 days after treatment with at least two therapies, such as Revlimid (lenalidomide) or Velcade (bortezomib).

The approval was based on a phase 2 clinical trial, in which patients received either Pomalyst and low-dose dexemethasone, a type of steroid, or Pomalyst alone. In those on Pomalyst alone, 7.4 percent had their cancer completely or partially disappear, compared with 29.2 percent for those receiving the combination. This response lasted for more than seven months in the combination arm.

Side effects included low white and red blood cell counts, fever and infections. For details, visit pomalyst.com or call 800-931-8691.

On Dec. 14, the FDA approved Iclusig (ponatinib) to treat adults with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistant or intolerant Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) and chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic, accelerated and blast phases. Both diseases contain the mutant BCR-ABL gene, which produces the bcr-abl tyrosine kinase, a protein that signals malignant white blood cells to grow. TKIs typically deactivate these proteins, but for some patients with the mutant gene T315I, TKIs are prevented from reaching these proteins. Iclusig targets cells with the T315I mutation and thwarts other mutations that make these cells resistant to treatment with traditional TKIs.

Side effects included high blood pressure, abdominal and joint pain, rash and fatigue. Iclusig also carries a boxed warning that it can cause blood clots and liver toxicity.

For details, visit iclusig.com or call 855-552-7423.

On Nov. 29, Cometriq (cabozantinib) received FDA approval for treating patients with metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. Although an estimated 56,000 Americans received a thyroid cancer diagnosis in 2012, only about 2,240 of these cases were medullary.

The approval was based on a 330-patient trial in which those who received Cometriq lived an average of 7.2 months longer without their cancer growing than patients who received placebo. Also, 27 percent of patients on the drug saw their tumors shrink, whereas for those on the placebo, there were no tumor size reductions.

Side effects included diarrhea, mouth sores, nausea and fatigue. A boxed warning also advises that severe bleeding and holes in the colon occurred in some patients taking this drug.

For details, visit cometriq.com or call 855- 253-3273.

In 2011, the FDA approved Zytiga (abiraterone acetate) to treat men with metastatic, hormone-resistant prostate cancer after their cancer had progressed while on docetaxel. But on Dec. 10, the FDA expanded Zytiga’s indication to treat this patient population before they’ve received chemotherapy.

The approval was based on a study of 1,088 men with metastatic, hormone-resistant prostate cancer who had not previously had chemotherapy. Men taking Zytiga had a median overall survival of 35.3 months compared with 30.1 months for those taking a placebo.

Side effects included fatigue, joint swelling, diarrhea and vomiting.

For details, visit zytiga.com or call 855-998-4421.

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