Effecting Change in Glioblastoma
August 20, 2015 – Dellann Elliott Mydland
Bookshelf: Surviving Cancer: Our Voices & Choices
August 27, 2015 – Marion Behr
Diagnosis on a Chip? No Longer Science Fiction
August 27, 2015 – Len Lichtenfeld
Healing in the Key of C: Joy in Music for Cancer Survivors
August 26, 2015 – Khevin Barnes
First Line: Taylor Swift Donates $50,000 to Help Fan Fund Cancer Treatment
August 26, 2015 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Pneumonitis: A Delayed Reaction
August 25, 2015
A Cultural and Scientific Tug of War
August 25, 2015 – Debu Tripathy
Giving Caregivers a Hand
August 25, 2015 – Melissa Silverberg
Time Management Techniques for Caregivers
August 25, 2015 – Melissa Silverberg
Keeping the World in World-Class Cancer Care
August 24, 2015 – Mike Hennessy, Sr.
Comments From Readers
August 24, 2015
Medical Marijuana: Smoking Out the Evidence
August 24, 2015 – Andrew Smith
Patients Unable to Work May Qualify for Disability Benefits
August 21, 2015 – Deanna Power
New Treatments May Be Worth the Wait in CLL
August 21, 2015 – Erik Ness
For Survivors of Cancer, Finding Love Involves an Extra Hurdle
August 21, 2015
Non-Physician Practitioners Playing Larger Roles in Cancer Care
August 20, 2015 – Melissa Quintero
In the Spotlight: Young-Adult Cancer
August 19, 2015
Supporting Teens and Young Adults Through Cancer
August 19, 2015 – Deborah Bell
Can a Low-Acid Diet Help Prevent Cancer?
August 18, 2015 – Dara Chadwick
Delayed Reaction
August 05, 2015 – Jodi Helmer
Effecting Change in Glioblastoma
August 20, 2015 – Dellann Elliott Mydland
Bookshelf: Surviving Cancer: Our Voices & Choices
August 27, 2015 – Marion Behr
Diagnosis on a Chip? No Longer Science Fiction
August 27, 2015 – Len Lichtenfeld
Healing in the Key of C: Joy in Music for Cancer Survivors
August 26, 2015 – Khevin Barnes
First Line: Taylor Swift Donates $50,000 to Help Fan Fund Cancer Treatment
August 26, 2015 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Pneumonitis: A Delayed Reaction
August 25, 2015
A Cultural and Scientific Tug of War
August 25, 2015 – Debu Tripathy
Giving Caregivers a Hand
August 25, 2015 – Melissa Silverberg
Time Management Techniques for Caregivers
August 25, 2015 – Melissa Silverberg
Currently Viewing
Keeping the World in World-Class Cancer Care
August 24, 2015 – Mike Hennessy, Sr.
Medical Marijuana: Smoking Out the Evidence
August 24, 2015 – Andrew Smith
Patients Unable to Work May Qualify for Disability Benefits
August 21, 2015 – Deanna Power
New Treatments May Be Worth the Wait in CLL
August 21, 2015 – Erik Ness
For Survivors of Cancer, Finding Love Involves an Extra Hurdle
August 21, 2015
Non-Physician Practitioners Playing Larger Roles in Cancer Care
August 20, 2015 – Melissa Quintero
In the Spotlight: Young-Adult Cancer
August 19, 2015
Supporting Teens and Young Adults Through Cancer
August 19, 2015 – Deborah Bell
Can a Low-Acid Diet Help Prevent Cancer?
August 18, 2015 – Dara Chadwick
Delayed Reaction
August 05, 2015 – Jodi Helmer
A Country Mile: Patients in Rural Areas Face Barriers to Treatment
August 18, 2015 – Don Vaughan

Keeping the World in World-Class Cancer Care

A cancer diagnosis can be perceived as a demarcation line, dividing life into a "before" period filled with all that's familiar and an "after" period clouded by the murky unknown.
BY Mike Hennessy, Sr.
PUBLISHED August 24, 2015
A cancer diagnosis can be perceived as a demarcation line, dividing life into a “before” period filled with all that’s familiar and an “after” period clouded by the murky unknown.

For many, the diagnosis sparks fear and a drive to ease it by gathering information — facts about the type of cancer in question, the prognoses that can be associated with it, the treatments available either on the market or in clinical trials, and insights about how best to bear up while dealing with the emotions and other physical and lifestyle implications that can accompany an illness.

CURE’s mission has always been to offer hope by providing those answers. Through the perspectives of experts -- from oncologists to advocacy group leaders to patients -- we bring you in-depth information about a host of cancer types and the most advanced thought about their treatment, insights about how and in whom those treatments may best be applied, tools for decisionmaking and a broad sampling of the kinds of medical and psychosocial support mechanisms that are available to patients and their loved ones.

In the summer issue of CURE, we emphasize our dedication to spreading that knowledge to every corner of the globe with a cover story about people with cancer who live in rural areas of the United States. These patients tend to live further from expert oncologic care while also experiencing lifestyle issues that can get in the way of treatment. Our article offers strategies to help rural Americans access the world-class cancer care and psychosocial help they deserve, with a focus on one technique in particular: telemedicine.

Another article sheds light on the growth and evolution of hospital-based programs for teens and young adults who have cancer. We think it’s vital for readers affected by teenage cancer -- before they choose treatment facilities -- to know about and consider such programs, which often include a specialized health care team and housing within a cancer center, aimed at supporting patients with the peer interaction, activities and counseling they need at their stage in life.

In addition, we offer two medical features — one detailing recent advances in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which have reverberated through the oncology world, and the other on medical marijuana and whether it can help patients with cancer to ease pain and nausea or increase appetite.

We also continue our commitment to sharing potentially paradigm-changing research by summarizing top stories from the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, as well as the most recent approvals of cancer drugs by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

We hope this issue of CURE highlights information you won’t find anywhere else, along with strategies and personal stories that will provide you with hope and inspiration as you navigate your cancer journey – no matter where you are. As always, thank you for reading.
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