Right on the Head: JAK Inhibitors May Reverse Hair Loss
April 15, 2017 – MARIJKE VROOMEN DURNING, RN
All in the Family: Discussing Screenings and Preventative Surgery for Inherited Cancers
April 17, 2017 – Arlene Weintraub
By Your Side: Oncology Nurses Provide Care, Inspiration
April 17, 2017 – Christopher Pirschel
The Nose Knows: Can Dogs Be Trained to Sniff Out Cancer?
April 18, 2017 – Heather Millar
A Dose of Caution: Avoiding Opioid Addiction
April 18, 2017 – Dara Chadwick
Moving Mountains for Multiple Myeloma: The Peak Is Just the Beginning
April 19, 2017 – Katie Kosko
The Unique Challenges of Living With Stage 4 Cancer
April 18, 2017 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Too Much of a Good Thing: When Cancer Drugs Become Dangerous
April 20, 2017 – Barbara Sadick
Life, Redefined: Living Well With Metastatic Cancer
April 20, 2017 – Jen Sotham
Preventing Lymphedema Flares in Patients With Breast Cancer
April 20, 2017 – HODA SAYEGH, B.A.; MARIA ASDOURIAN, B.S.; MEYHA SWAROOP, M.S.; CHERYL BRUNELLE, PT, M.S., CCS, CLT; AND ALPHONSE TAGHIAN, M.D., PH.D.
Understanding Mortality Rate Disparities Will Boost Cancer Prevention Efforts
April 24, 2017 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Finding the Right Balance
April 21, 2017 – Mike Hennessy, Sr.
mTOR Inhibitors for Cancer May Protect Fertility in Younger Female Patients
April 24, 2017 – Beth Fand Incollingo
A Genetics Awareness Campaign Will Improve Public Health
April 24, 2017 – Len Lichtenfeld, M.D.
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Letters From Our Readers: Spring 2017 Issue
April 25, 2017 – COMPILED BY STAFF EDITORS
Pitcher Back in Treatment for Cancer
April 26, 2017 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Protection Plan with Naloxone
April 26, 2017 – Beth Fand Incollingo

Letters From Our Readers: Spring 2017 Issue

Letters from you, our readers. 
BY COMPILED BY STAFF EDITORS
PUBLISHED April 25, 2017
CONCERNED FOR THE FUTURE OF U.S. MEDICAL CARE 

I am the widow of a man who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma that turned into progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy following experimental treatment with Rituxan (rituximab ) and Revlimid (lenalidomide). He was disabled, had a very low income and was insured by Medicare parts A, B and D. The subsidies he received for help with costs of insurance and treatments were what made it possible to treat his cancer and give us seven years together after his initial stage 4 diagnosis.

I am so concerned for the future of medical care for people without access to medical insurance or money to cover the costs of treatments.

The idea that our government is headed by people who don’t seem to care about those in need is abhorrent and terrifying. Thank you for mentioning the debates taking place in our nation’s capital and across the land. We need to advocate for all people’s access to insurance, so they’ll have health care and the potential of long lives.

Judit TornAllen
EUGENE, OREGON
AN OPTION FOR PRESERVING HAIR

There’s been much reported lately about cooling caps to save one’s hair when undergoing chemotherapy, but something also needs to be mentioned about a simple, inexpensive, no-side-effect alternative called Biotin. In 2013, I lost half my hair on FOLFOX chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer. In 2014, I lost nearly all of it to (the chemotherapy regimen) FOLFIRI. When I started losing clumps of hair last fall on the targeted drug Stivarga (regorafenib), I did frantic research and asked my oncologist about taking Biotin. She said it was fine. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s website recommends 2,500 micrograms a day.

Within days, my hair stopped falling out altogether. That was Nov. 13, and though I am still taking Stivarga, I haven’t lost any more hair in almost four months! This may not work for everyone, but surely it will work for some, as it did for me?

Mallory Schoen
MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA

Note from Editor-in-Chief Debu Tripathy, M.D.: Biotin (vitamin B7) can help in conditions that don’t cause full hair loss (older age, menopause, nutritional deficiencies, pregnancy), and also with nail strength, as it supports the activity of the protein keratin. Treatments such as FOLFOX and Stivarga do not cause as much hair loss as some others, such as the chemotherapy Adriamycin (doxorubicin). Therefore, Biotin may be useful for people taking agents such as FOLFIRI, but less so for those taking chemotherapies linked with larger-scale hair loss. Read more about alopecia. 
ENJOYED MYELOMA ARTICLE

Your recent article on multiple myeloma was great (“Have a Cocktail: Using Multiple Drugs to Treat Myeloma,” Fall 2016). I have read too much on the disease, as I am a patient, and this was one of the best. Thank you.
I also shared the magazine with a student nurse who is working on an oncology unit. Great job.
Alicia Junghans, RN
ELLINGTON, CONNECTICUT
APPRECIATED PALLIATIVE CARE PIECE

Thank you for your dedication to patient education and support! I enjoy reading CURE® and have recommended it to my patients for many years. I was particularly delighted to see your article on palliative care. I appreciate your efforts to help educate patients and families on the benefits of palliative care and its distinction from hospice care.

Sarah Thirlwell, M.Sc., M.Sc.(A), RN, CHPN, AOCNS
SUPPORTIVE CARE MEDICINE DIRECTOR
MOFFITT CANCER CENTER
TAMPA, FLORIDA
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