Transcending the Chaos of Cancer
May 21, 2018 – Deborah A. Boyle, M.S.N., RN, AOCNS, FAAN, Advanced Oncology Nursing Resources, Huntington Beach, California
Oncology: The Only Choice
May 22, 2018 – Kathy LaTour
Nursing Through the Prism of Childhood
May 27, 2018 – Kathy LaTour
Nurturing Patients and Nurses
June 02, 2018 – Amita Patel, NP-C, AOCNP, Regional Cancer Care Associates
An Oncology Pioneer
June 03, 2018 – Fred Hardwicke, M.D., Childress Regional Medical Center Cancer Clinic, Childress, and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock
Camping for Health
June 02, 2018 – Kathy LaTour
Improving Care Against All Odds
June 09, 2018 – Sr. Rosemary Donley, Ph.D., APRN, FAAN, Duquesne University
In the Hands of an Angel
June 10, 2018 – Jitsuda Sitthi-Amorn, M.D., St. Jude Children
The Day That Snow Brought Sunshine
June 17, 2018 – Patricia Jakel, M.N., RN, AOCN, Solid Tumor Program, UCLA, Santa Monica
Monday Morning Musings
June 20, 2018 – Justin Baker, M.D., St. Jude Children
Kathy Youngblood, Private Investigator
June 30, 2018 – Patricia Cathey, M.S.N., RN, NE-BC, St. Jude Children
Something Told Her to Become a Nurse
July 01, 2018 – Marilyn K. Stade
This Oncology Nurse Gives Back What She Receives
July 07, 2018 – Debbie Talley
The Oncology Nurse Is an Inspiration and an Example
July 08, 2018 – Marilyn K. Stade
Extraordinary Empathy in the World of Oncology
July 16, 2018 – Andrea Valera, RN, VA Palo Alto Health Care System
How One Oncology Nurse Exhibits the Best of Humanity
July 22, 2018 – Jacquelyn Pryor, Ph.D.
Currently Viewing
Pairing Diligence With Compassion in Cancer Care
July 21, 2018 – Margot Goodman
Compassion and Kind Ways in Oncology Nursing
July 26, 2018 – Edith Holder
Giving Is in Her DNA
July 29, 2018 – Deborah Dion
By My Side Through Cancer Treatments
July 27, 2018 – Malinda Blackshaw, RN
The Oncology Nurse Who Radiates Pink
July 28, 2018 – Eleanor K. Waldrup
Always a Step Ahead as an Oncology Nurse
August 04, 2018 – James G. Coe, Ph.D.
This Oncology Nurse Is Not Just Any Superhero
August 05, 2018 – Keitha V. Johnson
When Compassionate Cancer Care Meets Imagination
August 11, 2018 – Daniela Maniscalchi
An Anchor in a Time of Tumult
August 12, 2018 – Lillian Arleque, Ed.D.
From Devastation to Inspiration
August 18, 2018 – Wendy Tucker
Master of the Medical Matrix
August 19, 2018 – Linda McCarthy

Pairing Diligence With Compassion in Cancer Care

An Extraordinary Healer essay honoring MARCUS GASAWAY, B.S., RN, OCN [TEXAS ONCOLOGY-AUSTIN MIDTOWN, AUSTIN, TEXAS]
BY Margot Goodman
PUBLISHED July 21, 2018
Margot Goodman and Marcus Gasaway, B.S., RN, OCN
 - PHOTOS BY KELLY COLSON
Margot Goodman and Marcus Gasaway, B.S., RN, OCN - PHOTOS BY KELLY COLSON
As a patient at Texas Oncology-Austin Midtown for 11-plus years, I have seen my fair share of chemo/infusion oncology nurses come and go. Marcus Gasaway has been my infusion nurse for over three years, and I feel strongly that he should receive the recognition that he deserves.

Marcus works closely with patients to understand their personal needs, learning to provide emergency services and assisting other nurses when needed. He is such a caring individual and very compassionate about every single patient that he treats. When he accesses my Port-a-Cath, he always gets it on his first attempt, with an actual blood return — he is very gentle and causes very little pain. He makes sure to learn the names of every single patient that he treats or comes in contact with. Not only does Marcus know who you are, he goes above and beyond to make sure that you are feeling well and get the best care possible. If you have questions or don’t understand something, he will go over it with you until you do. If Marcus cannot answer your question(s), he will find someone who can.

Marcus always greets everybody with a smile. He asks how they’re feeling and how they’ve been doing. He knows who wants a warm blanket and who doesn’t. He knows who wants their bottled water at room temperature and who wants it cold. He knows who wants to watch TV and who wants to read a book. He knows who just wants to sleep. Marcus doesn’t judge you or treat you differently if you’re cranky or just plain tired.

He also doesn’t complain — ever! I’m there for eight hours for my infusion, as it has to be run very slow. I’ve spent a lot of time in that infusion chair, so I’ve been able to observe firsthand the professionalism that Marcus displays. I’ve seen him on several occasions come to the waiting room to help the sick and elderly walk back to the bay that he is running. When I have a reaction from my treatment, Marcus takes it upon himself to talk with my oncologist/hematologist, my pharmacist or whomever else he needs to check with to help reduce my side effects.

One day, I causally mentioned to Marcus that I might not be able to afford one of my pain medications. He quietly pulled me aside and showed me how I could find coupons for some medications on the computer. I also learned that I could call the manufacturer directly to see if they could help reduce my co-pay. I’m forever grateful to Marcus doing this for me.

Not only does Marcus complete excellent, quality work but I’ve also seen him help out his co-workers, such as taking late lunches to pitch in until things slowed down. He does this with a fantastic attitude and a very willing disposition. Marcus is a highly respected and often-requested chemo/infusion nurse. Although he is on his feet the entire day, he manages to maintain a standard of excellence, and his encouragement and support have made all the difference to me. I’m sure Marcus’ supervisor appreciates all his contributions to Texas Oncology-Midtown. I know I do.

Words of appreciation are nice, and they are sincere, but there are times when actions speak louder than words. I want to make sure you know how much Marcus is valued and appreciated, not just by me but by all his patients. I cannot think of a more deserving, compassionate individual for the Extraordinary Healer® Award.
Be the first to discuss this article on CURE's forum. >>
Talk about this article with other patients, caregivers, and advocates in the General Discussions CURE discussion group.

Related Articles

1
×

Sign In

Not a member? Sign up now!
×

Sign Up

Are you a member? Please Log In