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Keep Fighting, Be Strong: With Cancer, Words Blend Into Actions

BY Jackie
PUBLISHED September 29, 2016
Editor’s Note: This piece was submitted by a contributing writer and does not represent the views of CURE Media Group.
This path that I am traveling has been one of learning, both of the medical jargon and of new beginnings, new friends and new normal. I was diagnosed in February 2016 at the age of 47 with triple negative breast cancer. We never really know how we are going to react to this sort of diagnosis. I was initially stunned like, "Oh, OK, I have cancer!" and mindlessly messaged my husband and my mother with those words. Then I broke down and cried nonstop for a whole weekend; my husband broke down at night when he thought I wasn't awake. Cancer is as much a shock for our partners and family as it is for us.

I started hating the color pink and the words "lost the fight,” “fight hard” and all those things that are supposed to pick you up. It’s not up to us, and it’s not in our hands. If we don't make it, it’s not because we didn't try, fight or do our best. Then before I had time to process, the whirlwind started, telling family, friends, work. The ball started rolling with doctor appointments and referrals, blood tests, scans, theatre, scans, bloods, chemo, theatre, bloods, scans, radiation prep and here we are, heading into a six-week course of radiation. The seven months flew by at a speed of knots. I had a complete response to chemo and that is a good thing they tell me; however, as I am sure everyone knows, we take it one day at a time. Don't get too hopeful, take the time to heal and grow and regain a bit of normality.

I have met people on the way who have started out as strangers and are now friends, people who have checked in on me and given me the pep talks I needed and helped me with the information I needed to get through all the treatments.

The one thing I want to say is that the path is not as long as everyone thinks, and I was blessed with an amazing husband, family and medical team. There is hope in a tunnel of darkness, and if you take it hour by hour and trust your path, it is easier to walk. I still have to find my way into helping others, giving back and making a difference.
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