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Thank You, Cancer

Scott Hersh is a colon cancer survivor. His journey started in August 2012 when he was initially diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer at 48 years old. His journey continued with metastatic colon cancer (stage 4) in September 2013 and a recurrence again in January 2016. Each time, he endured six months of chemotherapy and had two major abdominal surgeries - one in September 2012 and one in June 2014. He is currently halfway through his third chemotherapy tour of duty. He receives his treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital and shared that he is extremely grateful for his dedicated doctors, nurses and their staff.
BY Scott Hersh
PUBLISHED May 25, 2016
Editor’s Note: This piece was submitted by a contributing writer and does not represent the views of CURE Media Group.
Thank You Cancer? Am I crazy?
Thank you, cancer. I really hate you.
Thank you, cancer. I mean, I really, really, really loathe you.
Thank you, cancer. It sucked when I had to have two major abdominal surgeries.
Thank you, cancer. It sucked when I had to have my fourth port installed.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I am sitting in the chair for three to five hours with poisonous drugs dripping through my port and into my blood.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I am nauseous and gagging and barfing.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I am sitting at home and more toxic drugs are pumping into me for an additional 46 hours.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when you give me that hangover feeling after chemotherapy has ended.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I have mouth sores and nose bleeds.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I have a metallic taste in my mouth most of the time.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I am fatigued and my brain is foggy.
Thank you, cancer. It sucks when I start to stress a week before my CT scan with scanxiety.
Thank you, cancer. You have impacted me greatly – the good, the bad and the ugly.
Thank you, cancer. Good? Yes!
Thank you, cancer. You showed me there is meaning to my cancer diagnosis – a silver lining.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me I am a survivor.
Thank you, cancer. You helped me learn so much about myself and my capabilities.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me who really cares about me.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that it is important to help others through their cancer journey.
Thank you, cancer. You helped strengthen my relationships.
Thank you, cancer. You helped make me more compassionate.
Thank you, cancer. You made me challenge myself more.
Thank you, cancer. You made me push myself more.
Thank you, cancer. You helped me to think about what my life goals are.
Thank you, cancer. You helped me become more driven.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that I can step up to a challenge head-on and face it and fight it with all I’ve got.
Thank you, cancer. You helped me realize that I could run both a half and a full marathon.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me I can handle anything.
Thank you, cancer. You helped me be more grateful for life and for the little things, because they are really the most important things.
Thank you, cancer. You made me a stronger person than I ever thought I could be – emotionally, mentally and physically.
Thank you, cancer. You made me a better person.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that sometimes the low points in life can lead you to the high points.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that cancer cells are tough, but I am tougher.
Thank you, cancer. You helped me realize that I have the strength, will power, mental fortitude and the strong desire to fight, survive and kick ass.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that when faced with adversity, I can be a winner.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that I can do anything I put my mind to.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me that I have the capabilities right now to do whatever I want. Thank you, cancer. You showed me that I shouldn’t wait until something happens to make me realize something I should already have known.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me it is better to go through life with a smile and happy attitude than pissed off and hating the world.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me what was already inside of me this whole time.
Thank you, cancer. You showed me life.

Thank you, cancer.  
 
 
 
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