Tubbs and Atlas Fires Causes Two California Hospitals to Evacuate

Wind-fueled wildfires in California’s wine country are blazing through homes and businesses, causing two area hospitals – Kaiser Permanente’s Santa Rosa branch and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital – to evacuate.
BY BRIELLE URCIUOLI @Brielle_U
PUBLISHED: OCTOBER 09, 2017
Wind-fueled wildfires in California’s wine country are blazing through homes and businesses, causing two area hospitals – Kaiser Permanente’s Santa Rosa branch and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital – to evacuate.

Mass evacuations of homes, schools and businesses are taking place through the Sonoma, Napa and Yuba counties. Edmund G. Brown Jr., the governor of California, declared all three counties to be in a state of emergency on Monday morning.

At Kaiser Permanente, patients being treated in their Santa Rosa location were transported to the San Rafael campus and “other local hospitals,” according to their Twitter account. Per Kaiser Permanente Northern California’s Twitter, about 130 total patients were involved in the evacuation. Those who needed medical support were transported via ambulance, while others went via bus, according to a press statement from Kaiser Permanente.

To find out where their loved ones have been transferred, family members can call 855-599-0033. Nurses and staff can call their local staffinc centers if they are willing and able to assist. 

"Kaiser Permanente is making an initial $250,000 donation to the American Red Cross to help with the community’s immediate needs. We will continue to evaluate the situation throughout the day and provide more information as it becomes available," the statement said. 

But in the mean time, all appointments and surgeries scheduled to take place Kaiser Permanente’s Napa and Santa Rosa locations have been cancelled, as were appointments at Sutter Hospital in Santa Rosa.

“Due to the Santa Rosa Tubbs fire, the hospital is inaccessible, but all patients and staff are safe,” Sutter Santa Rosa Hospital posted on their Facebook page. The hospital’s website also mentioned that all appointments and surgeries scheduled through Tuesday, Oct. 10 are canceled.

According to their website, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital is involved in about 20 cancer-related clinical trials, ranging from phase 1 to 3. Currently, they are running trials for: refractory advanced biliary carcinoma, breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, kidney cancer and smoldering myeloma.

CURE reporters reached out to both hospitals for more information on the evacuation, but have not heard back  from Sutter Santa Rosa.

The fires have burned through more than 35,000 acres of land in Napa county so far, destroying both homes and businesses, as reported by the LA Times.

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