With Genomic Insights, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Therapies are Evolving
August 23, 2016 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Building Consistency into Health Care for Patients with Cancer
August 24, 2016 – MIKE HENNESSY, SR.
Medical Illustration: Marine-Derived Cancer Treatments
August 31, 2016 – Erin Moore
Comments From Readers on CURE's Summer 2016 Issue
August 30, 2016 – COMPILED BY STAFF EDITORS
Should Immunocompromised Patients With Cancer Worry About Drinking Water?
August 30, 2016 – Roberta Codemo and Katie Kosko
End Stage: Talking About End-of-Life With Those With Cancer
August 30, 2016 – Mirchelle Louis
Rescuing the Rescuers: The Effort to Cover and Monitor 9/11 Responders for Lung Disease and Cancer
August 29, 2016 – Mark Cantrell
"Let's Win" Aims to Reduce Research Burden for Those with Pancreatic Cancer
August 29, 2016 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Oncology Groups Praise FDA Decision to Regulate E-Cigarettes
August 29, 2016 – Katie Kosko
Shannen Doherty Shares an Emotional Cancer Moment
August 26, 2016 – Beth Fand Incollingo
A Coloring Book for Getting Through Tough Times During Cancer
August 26, 2016 – Katie Kosko
Cancer Moonshot Should Make Clinical Trials a Priority
August 26, 2016 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
Facing Skin Cancer Risk
August 25, 2016 – Christopher Pirschel
Training Could Make the Caregiving Experience More Manageable
August 25, 2016 – Katie Kosko and Ellie Leick
The Picture of Health: Art Exhibits in Cancer Centers Help Patients and Families Heal
August 24, 2016 – Marilyn Fenichel
A Strong Stomach: Eliminating Nausea and Vomiting for Patients With Cancer
August 23, 2016 – Dara Chadwick
Battling for Benefits: Military Veterans With Cancer Fight for Government-Funded Health Care
August 23, 2016 – Mark Cantrell
Chaos Theory: Understanding the Genetic Chaos of Soft Tissue Sarcoma
August 22, 2016 – Arlene Weintraub
Pet Project: Trained Therapy Animals Boost the Moods of Hospitalized Patients With Cancer
August 22, 2016 – Theresa Sullivan Barger
With Genomic Insights, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Therapies are Evolving
August 23, 2016 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Building Consistency into Health Care for Patients with Cancer
August 24, 2016 – MIKE HENNESSY, SR.
Currently Viewing
Medical Illustration: Marine-Derived Cancer Treatments
August 31, 2016 – Erin Moore
Should Immunocompromised Patients With Cancer Worry About Drinking Water?
August 30, 2016 – Roberta Codemo and Katie Kosko
End Stage: Talking About End-of-Life With Those With Cancer
August 30, 2016 – Mirchelle Louis
Rescuing the Rescuers: The Effort to Cover and Monitor 9/11 Responders for Lung Disease and Cancer
August 29, 2016 – Mark Cantrell
"Let's Win" Aims to Reduce Research Burden for Those with Pancreatic Cancer
August 29, 2016 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Oncology Groups Praise FDA Decision to Regulate E-Cigarettes
August 29, 2016 – Katie Kosko
Shannen Doherty Shares an Emotional Cancer Moment
August 26, 2016 – Beth Fand Incollingo
A Coloring Book for Getting Through Tough Times During Cancer
August 26, 2016 – Katie Kosko
Cancer Moonshot Should Make Clinical Trials a Priority
August 26, 2016 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
Facing Skin Cancer Risk
August 25, 2016 – Christopher Pirschel
Training Could Make the Caregiving Experience More Manageable
August 25, 2016 – Katie Kosko and Ellie Leick
The Picture of Health: Art Exhibits in Cancer Centers Help Patients and Families Heal
August 24, 2016 – Marilyn Fenichel
A Strong Stomach: Eliminating Nausea and Vomiting for Patients With Cancer
August 23, 2016 – Dara Chadwick
Battling for Benefits: Military Veterans With Cancer Fight for Government-Funded Health Care
August 23, 2016 – Mark Cantrell
Chaos Theory: Understanding the Genetic Chaos of Soft Tissue Sarcoma
August 22, 2016 – Arlene Weintraub
Pet Project: Trained Therapy Animals Boost the Moods of Hospitalized Patients With Cancer
August 22, 2016 – Theresa Sullivan Barger

Medical Illustration: Marine-Derived Cancer Treatments

YONDELIS (trabectedin) and HALAVEN (eribulin) are the first chemotherapies originally derived from marine life, although they are now synthetically made. Both drugs are approved for the treatment of liposarcoma, and Yondelis also for the treatment of leiomyosarcoma.
BY Erin Moore
PUBLISHED August 31, 2016
YONDELIS (trabectedin) and HALAVEN (eribulin) are the first chemotherapies originally derived from marine life, although they are now synthetically made. Both drugs are approved for the treatment of liposarcoma, and Yondelis also for the treatment of leiomyosarcoma. These conditions are types of soft tissue sarcoma, meaning that they are among at least 50 rare cancers that have individual characteristics but start in the body’s connective tissues. Halaven is also approved for the treatment of breast cancer.

YONDELIS was originally made from sea squirts, or the marine organism Ecteinascidia turbinata. It works by stopping the abnormal multiplication of cancer cells within the body that would otherwise spread, destroying nearby tissues. It does this by binding to and damaging the DNA in cancer cells, causing the cells to die.
Yondelis was originally made from sea squirts, or the marine organism Ecteinascidia turbinata. It works by stopping the abnormal multiplication of cancer cells within the body that would otherwise spread, destroying nearby tissues. It does this by binding to and damaging the DNA in cancer cells, causing the cells to die.
1. Yondelis has two regions: one that binds to DNA and another that protrudes from the DNA so it can interact with cellular proteins, particularly DNA cleaving enzymes.

2. Yondelis binds to the minor groove of DNA, and this distorts the double helix, causing it to bend.

3. Most DNA-targeted drugs bind to the major groove. The binding of Yondelis to the minor groove allows the drug to interact with specific proteins in cancer cells, preventing cell copying and causing double-strand breaks in DNA. This leads to the failure of DNA to properly divide and, in turn, activates programmed cell death.

HALAVEN was derived from an antibiotic substance, halichondrin B, that is produced by a type of black sponge that lives along the coast of Japan. The drug works by stopping the process of cell division within cancer cells.
Halaven was derived from an antibiotic substance, halichondrin B, that is produced by a type of black sponge that lives along the coast of Japan. The drug works by stopping the process of cell division within cancer cells.
1. The mitotic spindle is a mechanism responsible for furnishing newly forming cells with chromosomes, which contain each cell’s DNA. During mitosis, or cell division, chromosomes line up along the mitotic spindle.

2. The mitotic spindle is made up of microtubules, which are composed of tubulin subunits (dimers).

3. The microtubules are in a constant state of polymerization (growth) and depolymerization (shortening), which causes the microtubules to be unstable. This instability is a crucial component of mitosis.

4. Halaven blocks microtubule growth by binding to the growing ends of the microtubules. When this blocking occurs, cancer cell division ceases. The cells ultimately die. Halaven does not interfere with microtubule shortening.
Be the first to discuss this article on CURE's forum. >>
Talk about this article with other patients, caregivers, and advocates in the General Discussions CURE discussion group.

Related Articles

1
×

Sign In

Not a member? Sign up now!
×

Sign Up

Are you a member? Please Log In