7 Recent Updates in the Field of Women's Cancers

In honor of International Women’s Day, CURE® compiled some recent news and updates in women’s cancers that patients, survivors and caregivers may have missed.

There have been multiple updates in the field of women’s cancers over the past several months. In honor of International Women’s Day, CURE® looks back at some of the latest news and updates affecting women with breast, ovarian and other women’s cancers.

  • Radiation after initial cancer treatment in women with uterine carcinosarcomas may reduce the rate of distant metastases (cancer development in another part of the body), according to recent study results. READ MORE.
  • A patient with metastatic breast cancer recalls how she connected with the Breast Cancer Recurrence Project and how the project aims to revolutionize and bring accuracy to what is already known about those who live with metastatic breast cancer. READ MORE.
  • A breast cancer survivor shares how she recently looked back at her journey with wigs, or “the girls” as she called them, during her early part of treatment. READ MORE.
  • Although a gynecologic oncologist has spent a good part of her career helping patients during their cancer journeys, she took it upon herself to take one step further to educate women on how they can advocate for themselves and potentially prevent cancer before it impacts their lives. READ MORE.
  • An ovarian cancer survivor shares that although she’s been frustrated and mad about a recent recurrence in her lymph nodes, she still celebrates the life that she’s been blessed with. READ MORE.
  • Even as chemotherapy, surgery and radiation remain treatment mainstays in triple-negative breast cancer, immunotherapy is ready to take the stage. READ MORE.
  • The Society of Breast Imaging has recommended women wait four to six weeks after receiving their second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine to get a screening mammogram. However, experts differ on whether women should wait to get a screening mammogram following their vaccine. READ MORE.

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