A Day in the Life of Chemo Treatment Is Not a Horror Story

Though it may seem like it sometimes, cancer is not the Boogey Man.

Twelve days after my third chemo treatment, and things are becoming somewhat routine as the next chemo treatment creeps closer. I can’t help but look up at the calendar and read the little word “chemo” on the box marked March 18.

Wait, that can’t be right, that’s next Friday. I say to myself. Quit looking there, quit looking there. But it’s like one of those horror movies, except without the weird background music.

Then I put some good thoughts in my head. Get real, this is not a horror movie. There is no crazy lunatic on the loose and you are definitely not the stupid cheerleader running in high heels anyway. You would be more likely the heroine of the movie telling everyone they’re idiots and figuring out who the murderer is, taking matters in your own hands and running him over and over with the truck. So no, you are not in a horror movie, this is real life, and even if it was a movie, you would be the one kicking some rear anyway!

So, the date is not looming, it’s just another round of drugs. This time Taxotere (docetaxel) and I won’t have the nasty Nuelasta (pegfilgrastim) to tick away until it goes off, 27 hours later. This is just cancer and how modern medicine handles it.

No Boogey Man here, just life in this sick and disease-ridden system. This is how we do it here, we dump drugs to kill the real Boogey Man in your body, wipe those little ugly ducks out and flush them down the toilet! No running them over and over with a truck, just some good old poison! Fry them and hold your breath so you don’t breathe in the fumes too much.

Sure you’ll be coughing and wheezing, you might get a little singed, but you’ll be the one dragging your bleeding and scratched body out of it. No place for whiny wimpy bimbos here, survival is reserved for the smart, strong and determined. Whatever it takes, and like any horror movie, it can take several different approaches, but the Boogey Man gets it in the end. No sequels here!

I know, my mind can really take some twists, but this is my arsenal so far besides the chemo. I read the cards people sent me all the time, and they strengthen me. I take a slew of vitamins, and some nausea stuff and use my lavender neck and eye pillows that I keep cold. I keep my tablet, lots of prayers and my Bible close by. My family and loved ones, including a supportive work staff and wonderful boss, constantly visits, texts and calls. This here is the really good stuff, this is what will get you through anything and come out the victor as a survivor! No stupid wooden stakes, silver bullets or ropes of garlic. That’s for dummies!