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P: 800-210-2873

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CURE Media Group.
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Cure Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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Brain Cancer

Feature Video
Watch a video about Chad, a patient using Optune.
Learn how Chad manages his treatment while enjoying his favorite activities.
Jessica Skarzynski
The potential differences in the genetic risk factors among men and women for developing glioma may shed light on a new way to assess such risks, according to a meta-analysis published in Scientific Reports.
 
Beth Fand Incollingo
An Idaho teenager a boost from one of her idols — former Vice President Joe Biden — during her treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.
MIKE HENNESSY, SR.
Research continues to drive the oncology field.
Tracey Gamer-Fanning
I was given a three- to five-year life expectancy. I told my neuro-oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center that all I heard was that I could expect more life.
Heather Millar
The approach used in discussing palliative care can play a role in whether a patient seeks help.
Heather Millar
Innovations in drug development, surgery, radiation and clinical trials have investigators hard at work in glioblastoma.
Samira Rajabi
My heart seeks joy. My life is joyful, full of light. And I know trauma can live in the light, I have seen it and lived it.
Katie Kosko
Researchers from Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, North Carolina, developed a genetically modified poliovirus to attack the rare but aggressive brain cancer by directly injecting the virus into the tumor.
Brielle Urciuoli
The majority of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who are diagnosed with cancer are expected to live past the five-year mark, though survival and health outcomes seem to differ by disease type, according to recent research published in the journal Cancer.
Samira Rajabi
When my mom got cancer, the last thing on my mind was my own health, but she had the foresight and the care to get a genetic test so that her kids could live long and healthy lives. Today I am grateful for my mom, my whole family and the magic of science.
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