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Patients With Invasive Lobular Carcinoma Tend to Have Worse Outcomes

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A recent study found that breast cancer–specific survival in patients with invasive lobular carcinoma was inferior compared to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma.

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A recent study found that breast cancer-specific survival outcomes were worse for patients with invasive lobular carcinoma when compared with patients with invasive ductal carcinoma within the first 10 years after becoming diagnosed.

The main objective of the study, which was published in JAMA Network, was to examine long-term survival outcomes within premenopausal patients with invasive lobular carcinoma or invasive ductal carcinoma. Patients included in the study had to become diagnosed between 1990 and 2015, with stage 1 through three 3 invasive lobular carcinoma or invasive ductal carcinoma.

Database information from SEER, KBCR and AMCR were used.

Within the SEER database, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other factors such as race were analyzed while investigating the cancer type differences, while the KBCR database focuses on obtaining mortality data. Survival and cause of death were found within this database for patients involved within the study.

The AMCR database was able to detect what kind of treatments these patients received. Alongside this, the database also picked up features of breast tumors, treatment, recurrence and death information.

Patients with either invasive lobular carcinoma or invasive ductal carcinoma who were younger than 50 years old were evaluated within the study, for breast cancer-specific survival. The primary outcome of the study focused on breast cancer-related mortality, while also investigating other causes of death.

Data from 170,352 patients were taken from the SEER database; 45,782 patients in the KBCR database; and 9,804 patients in the AMCR database. The age median for the SEER database group was 42.7, 41.8 in the KBCR database and 41.8 in the AMCR database. The median follow up time was 90 months in the SEER database, 94 in the KBCR database and 120 in the AMCR database.

Breast cancer–specific survival was lower for patients with invasive lobular carcinoma. Specifically, it was 27% lower according to data from the SEER database, and 50% lower in the AMCR database in comparison to invasive ductal carcinoma. These results were accounting for other factors factors such as age, cancer stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status.

When analyzing the hormone receptor status, patients with invasive lobular carcinoma showed worsened survival in comparison to invasive ductal carcinoma after 10 years post-diagnosis.

Invasive ductal carcinoma also increased when it came to recurrence rates throughout the first five years of diagnosis, alongside the hazard rate, while invasive lobular carcinoma showed increasing recurrence rates within the first years of diagnosis.

Several other studies had been previously evaluating the outcomes of both invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma.

Findings show that invasive lobular carcinoma shows poorer results when in comparison to invasive ductal carcinoma, according to the recent study presented in Jama Network.

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