People Share Their Thoughts on Getting the HPV Vaccine to Help Prevent Certain Types of Cancer Later in Life

On social media, CURE® recently asked its readers to share their thoughts on getting the HPV vaccine to help prevent certain types of cancer later in life. Here is what some of them shared.

Each week on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, CURE® asks its readers to share their thoughts with a #CureConnect discussion question.

This past week, we asked: “What are your thoughts on getting the HPV vaccine to help prevent certain types of cancer later in life?”

Here’s what some of our readers shared:

  • “I turn 50 in April and had the HPV vaccine shot series last fall due to abnormalities and HPV randomly showing up in my pap exams for several years now. As a 10-year cancer survivor, I'm willing to try anything that might help prevent another form of cancer for me.” – T.T-R.
  • “I had early-stage cervical cancer — twice. Diagnosed with HPV, probably received from my ex-husband. I was in my mid to late 30s. The second time my OB/GYN told me that some women — even though they were older than the recommended age bracket to receive the vaccine — took the shots and it helped keep HPV at bay. It was worth a try to help save my life. I talked to a lady who faced similar circumstances and she got the vaccine and it kept her HPV away. Since 2008, I have been without HPV after having the vaccines — and thank god, no more cervical cancer. To each their own choice — mine was best for me and it worked (so far).” – T.A.
  • “I recommend the HPV vaccine. I was diagnosed with HPV-positive cervical cancer at 23. I didn’t have the vaccine. If I did, my cancer wouldn’t have happened, and I wouldn’t have had my fertility stolen from me with a hysterectomy at 23.” – L.L.
  • “If it had been available when I was young, I would have taken it.” – V.C.
  • “I wish it was available when I was younger. I would have received it. I was diagnosed with HPV-related cervical cancer just before my 32nd birthday.” – T.C.
  • “I wish I would have done it. ‘What are the chances of me getting that cancer?’ Cue 10 years later when I was diagnosed with stage 3B endocervical adenocarcinoma at 24, then a metastatic recurrence in my lungs at 25. I lost my fertility, I have irreversible radiation damage, osteoporosis, lymphedema. The list goes on and on but hey, I’m alive.” – M.N.
  • “As a cervical cancer survivor, I wish it would have been available when I was younger. I truly hope parents will make the choice to vaccinate their children.” – T.R.
  • “I'm a survivor of deadly uterine papillary serous carcinoma. I had been diagnosed with cancer-causing HPV about five years prior. Yes, give the vaccine to young people.” – J.H.

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