You’re Not the Same After Cancer ‘and That’s OK,’ Says Andrew McMahon

Video

Singer-songwriter Andrew McMahon is not the same person he was before his leukemia diagnosis, and that’s OK, he said.

Lingering thoughts of cancer do not go away, but it is possible to build a hopeful life during survivorship, explained Andrew McMahon, a singer-songwriter and survivor of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

While touring with his then-band, Jack ‘s Mannequin in 2005, McMahon was diagnosed with ALL, and underwent chemotherapy, radiation and a stem cell transplant. At first, he told CURE® that he struggled during survivorship, but thanks to support from those around him and the passion he had for his career, he was able to find himself once again.

READ MORE: ‘Beginning of Finding Yourself’ During Cancer Survivorship

“I have so many good memories on the other side of my cancer,” he said. “I think that really is the unfortunate — but also hopeful — reality of what it is to survive trauma or a disease (is) that it just takes time to build up a world for yourself because you're not going to be the same person, and that's OK.”

Transcription

It never goes away. You know, it is … always there and I think at least, you know, luckily for me, I've finally reached a place where my life post-cancer is … more than half of my life almost. … But it is so substantial and has been so rewarding; I have so many good memories on the other side of my cancer, and I think that really is the unfortunate — but also hopeful — reality of what it is to survive trauma or a disease (is) that it just takes time to build up a world for yourself because you're not going to be the same person, and that's OK. … But it took me a long time to make peace with that and say, “OK, well then now I have to make this world a good one to live in, and I'm fortunate that … we have a really nice life, and a lot of good things have happened to me since cancer.” … My daughter, my wife, my marriage, … I live in a beautiful place by a beach that I've always wanted to live in, you know what I mean? And we live simply, but I feedmy family doing something I love and, and all that is after cancer, so it's been a process for sure.

For more news on cancer updates, research and education, don’t forget to subscribe to CURE®’s newsletters here.

Related Videos
Image of Dr. Jorge Cortes; a man with short dark hair wearing a suit.
Image of a man with brown hair.
Image of a woman with short brown hair and glasses.
Image of a woman with short brown hair and glasses.
Image of a man with brown hair and a suit and tie.
Image of a woman with brown bobbed hair with glasses.
Image of Dr. Minesh Mehta at ASCO 2024.
Image of a woman with blond hai
Image of a man with rectangular glasses and short dark hair.
Related Content