Share Your Story

Share Your Story Submissions

There are so many questions that come with a cancer diagnosis — questions about treatment, side effects, caregiving, survivorship and more.
Your stories help us achieve our mission of combining science and humanity to make cancer understandable.
To share your story, submit it via a Word document to editor@curetoday.com for your chance to have your story highlighted here, and please be sure to include "Share Your Story" in the subject line.
CURE® accepts submissions of personal essays from readers relating to their own cancer experience. Submission of your work to CURE® does not guarantee publication. CURE® does not offer compensation for general submissions.
Submissions shall:

  • Consist of 500-800 words.
  • Be submitted to editor@curetoday.com as an attachment in a Word document.
  • Consist of original work created entirely by you and of which all rights belong to you. The work should not have been published elsewhere or currently submitted elsewhere.
  • Not violate any person or entity’s copyright, trademark, or right of privacy or any other right.

CURE® reserves the right to edit submissions for clarity, content, and length and in accordance with CURE®’s style guide and standards. By submitting your work to CURE®, you acknowledge that the ownership of the copyright rights in any edited version belong to CURE® as an original creation of a derivative work. You also acknowledge that if you submit work elsewhere, you will not have the right to use CURE®’s edited version without CURE®’s prior written permission.

Your Recent Stories

Block the Burn: How to Choose the Right Sunscreen

June 27th 2021

Learn the differences between sunscreen types and what to look for.

The Guide’s Silhouette

June 24th 2021

A breast cancer survivor writes a poem about a symbol of reassurance she saw while fatigued from cancer treatments.

Having Compassion for Others During Cancer Treatment

June 17th 2021

A woman with stage 4 ovarian cancer discusses the importance of having compassion for other people, because you never know what they may be dealing with.

From Tested to Transformed

June 1st 2021

A survivor of fibrosarcoma shares his journey through treatment and how he learned to build strength and confidence after the ordeal physically changed his face.

The Cancer Diagnosis That Seemed to Make Little Sense

May 24th 2021

A retirement counselor with bladder cancer shares the story of his diagnosis and his thoughts on treatment.

What Becomes Priority When An Illness Steps Foot Front and Center?

May 23rd 2021

A survivor of multiple cancers over the span of 27 years expresses her feelings about her cancer journey through a poem.

The Underwater Tug of Cancer

May 16th 2021

A retired public health specialist and survivor of both thyroid and breast cancer pens a poem about her experiences with treatment and what it’s like to be “pulled under the water” by cancer.

Traveling Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic As A Cancer Survivor

May 15th 2021

A skin and breast cancer survivor expresses her thoughts on travel restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected her family.

Brain Cancer Interrupted My Life at the Peak of My Career

May 14th 2021

A long-term brain cancer survivor shares the story of his cancer journey and where it led his life.

My Story: In Defense of Grief

May 12th 2021

A man who lost his wife to melanoma explains how he channeled his grief into advocacy that led to a change in legislation.

Rage at the Sun

May 7th 2021

A melanoma survivor pens a poem about his cancer journey, losing his wife to melanoma and how he lives his life after these experiences.

Stories of Loss and Survival with Melanoma

April 30th 2021

Which story – of hope or fear – is the best experience to relate to help another?

What Do You Say to Someone Who Has Cancer?

April 25th 2021

A cancer survivor shares advice on how people can support a friend with cancer.

When A Child is in Treatment for Cancer, Their Caregivers Become A Vital Resource

April 21st 2021

A pediatric oncology nurse offers advice for parents or primary caregivers on how to support their child during cancer treatment.

How a Young Patient With Cancer Made Me a Better Nurse

April 13th 2021

An oncology nurse recalls how a young patient with Ewing sarcoma she helped care for taught her about bravery and being honest with patients. Here, she writes how he made her a better nurse.

Overcoming a Mesothelioma Diagnosis at a Young Age

April 12th 2021

Mesothelioma has been categorized as an “older persons” disease, writes a 14-year survivor. Which is why, she writes, her and her family were completely caught off-guard when she was diagnosed at 21.

Reading Has Helped Me Navigate ‘Cancerland’

April 11th 2021

A patient recently diagnosed with cancer writes how with the help of the people she loves, as well as the wisdom, humor and empathy of books, she has continued to navigate her new country: “Cancerland”.

How One Cancer ‘Thriver’ Finds Peace and Strength From the Ocean

April 4th 2021

A “thriver” of triple-negative breast cancer shares a poem to mark the 10th anniversary of her survivorship.

A Letter to My Doctors: You Don’t Know Me

March 15th 2021

A four-time cancer survivor writes a personal letter to her future doctors. She urges doctors to see her and not her diagnosis.

While Cancer is Not Fun, There is Hope Every Day

March 4th 2021

An ovarian cancer survivor shares that although she’s been frustrated and mad about a recent recurrence in her lymph nodes, she still celebrates the life that she’s been blessed with.

When It Comes to Cancer, See the Person and Not the Disease

March 1st 2021

An oncology nurse offers people tips on how to find the courage and be better advocates to their loved ones who may be receiving treatment for cancer.

If I Can Face Cancer, I Can Face Anything

February 18th 2021

Within a short period of time, Darlene Benson lost her dog, brother-in-law, and some of her best friends. But, at the same time, she conquered cancer. She says that if she can face that, she can face anything.

Compassionate Care Goes A Long Way When Receiving Treatment for Cancer

February 10th 2021

A patient with cancer recalls how the love her care team showed her during her treatment made such a difference in her journey to recovery. Her hope: That more patients with cancer around the world can find doctors who treat them as a person, and not just a case.

‘Scanxiety’ Can Make Cancer Survivors Irrational and Irritable

February 9th 2021

A penile cancer survivor recalls how he can become irrational and lash out at his loved ones during the days leading up to his next scans. His wish: To be normal again.

Looking At Yourself Differently After Cancer

February 8th 2021

Moment by moment, we move toward life. We feel what needs to be felt. We can even feel through the numb parts—the broken pieces. Instead of looking somewhere else, we look straight on— at ourselves and others. We see what’s really there. Who is there for us? Who is not? We choose to be with those we love, and those who love us back—like the person in the mirror, the new friend.

Your Life Is Not Over Because of Cancer

February 6th 2021

At the moment it may be hard to realize, but your life is not over because of cancer.

Image Visualization Helped Complement My Cancer Treatment

February 1st 2021

A cancer survivor, who is in her 14th year of remission, recalls how image visualization complemented her cancer treatment and suggests the practice may help others.

Winter And Entering Hospice

January 31st 2021

With winter upon us, a caregiver discusses how the end of life is akin to the cycle of seasons and how hospice does not have to be a challenging hurdle.

No One Ever Sees a Cancer Diagnosis Coming, Especially When it Involves Their Penis

January 26th 2021

A cancer survivor writes about how he, like many, was blindsided by his diagnosis and what it was like to receive treatment for a rare disease: penile cancer.

To Tell or Not to Tell About My Mastectomy

January 13th 2021

A cancer survivor discusses how she decides to discuss her mastectomy and the acceptance of her body after treatment for cancer.