Currently Viewing
Getting Personal
October 30, 2015 – Mike Hennessy, Sr.
Mustering the Courage to Decide on Treatment
October 30, 2015 – Merle Sprinzen Tessier
Medical Illustration: Breast Cancer
October 28, 2015 – Pam Curry
Positive Energy: Preventing Local Recurrence of Breast Cancer With Radiation
October 27, 2015 – Dara Chadwick
On the Fence: The Pros and Cons of Breast Screening
October 26, 2015 – Tara Haelle
A Different World: Metastatic Breast Cancer
October 23, 2015 – Heather Millar
Considerations for Breast Reconstruction Surgery
October 23, 2015 – Aimee Swartz
Lumpectomy or Mastectomy for Localized Breast Cancer: A Personal Decision
October 22, 2015 – Aimee Swartz
Breast Cancer Treatment Plan Should Include Weight Management
October 21, 2015 – Tony Hagen
Preventive Drugs Keep Cancer "and Fear" Away
October 21, 2015 – Sonya Collins
Improving Outcomes and Accommodating Preferences in Earlier-Stage Breast Cancer
October 20, 2015 – Sonya Collins
Angelina Jolie Sparks Rise in Genetic Testing for Treat Breast Cancer
October 19, 2015 – Arlene Weintraub
Getting Personal
October 30, 2015 – Mike Hennessy, Sr.
A Worthwhile Investment
October 30, 2015 – Debu Tripathy
Mustering the Courage to Decide on Treatment
October 30, 2015 – Merle Sprinzen Tessier
Medical Illustration: Breast Cancer
October 28, 2015 – Pam Curry
Positive Energy: Preventing Local Recurrence of Breast Cancer With Radiation
October 27, 2015 – Dara Chadwick
On the Fence: The Pros and Cons of Breast Screening
October 26, 2015 – Tara Haelle
A Different World: Metastatic Breast Cancer
October 23, 2015 – Heather Millar
Considerations for Breast Reconstruction Surgery
October 23, 2015 – Aimee Swartz
Lumpectomy or Mastectomy for Localized Breast Cancer: A Personal Decision
October 22, 2015 – Aimee Swartz
Breast Cancer Treatment Plan Should Include Weight Management
October 21, 2015 – Tony Hagen
Preventive Drugs Keep Cancer "and Fear" Away
October 21, 2015 – Sonya Collins
Improving Outcomes and Accommodating Preferences in Earlier-Stage Breast Cancer
October 20, 2015 – Sonya Collins
Angelina Jolie Sparks Rise in Genetic Testing for Treat Breast Cancer
October 19, 2015 – Arlene Weintraub

Getting Personal

Treatment for breast cancer is progressing ever forward, with new options routinely making their way into the oncologist's toolbox.
BY Mike Hennessy, Sr.
PUBLISHED October 30, 2015

Treatment for breast cancer is progressing ever forward, with new options – from small tweaks that modify existing regimens to the development of promising investigational drugs – routinely making their way into the oncologist’s toolbox. As a result of this evolution, personalized medicine has become central to breast cancer treatment.

This means not only that individual genetics are taken into account, but also that patient preference has become a vitally important determining factor in how treatments are selected. As a result, patients have choices, but also a greater responsibility to learn about the therapies that are available, and how those treatments might affect them. Our goal in this special issue of CURE is to make sure our readers have that information, regardless of their breast cancer subtype or stage of disease.

As you’ll see in these pages, the focus on patient preference holds true throughout all stages of screening and treatment for breast cancer.

We discuss the need for women at average risk of developing breast cancer to know the pros and cons associated with screening mammograms — and for women worried about hereditary breast cancer to carefully weigh their decisions about genetic testing and preventive treatment. Most women with breast cancer undergo surgery, and our article on this topic delves into the choices for those with unilateral disease – lumpectomy or mastectomy. We also detail how medical oncologists can add patient preference into the mix, honing the newest therapies and regimens to match the genetics and wishes of specific groups, and switching from one treatment to another when those with metastatic disease experience side effects that jeopardize their quality of life. Radiation, too, can be tailored, we report – for instance, increasing the dose and cutting down the length of treatment time can make the process more convenient for patients.

We hope this issue of CURE helps to familiarize you with a comprehensive array of newer and older therapies for various subtypes and stages of breast cancer, their potential benefits and side effects, and why they may or may not make sense as part of your treatment plan. If our in-depth articles on these topics give you the information you need to discuss potentially beneficial treatment plans with your oncologist, or serve as a jumping-off point that helps you determine which techniques to research further on your own, then CURE has lived up to its mission of providing guidance, education and inspiration to those experiencing cancer. As always, thank you for reading.

Mike Hennessy, Sr
Chairman and CEO

Be the first to discuss this article on CURE's forum. >>
Talk about this article with other patients, caregivers, and advocates in the Breast Cancer CURE discussion group.

Related Articles

1
×

Sign In

Not a member? Sign up now!
×

Sign Up

Are you a member? Please Log In