What Advice Would You Give Someone Looking to Help A Friend or Loved One with Cancer?

August 4, 2020

On social media, CURE® recently asked its readers to share the advice they would give someone looking to help a friend or loved one with cancer. Here, we share some of their responses.

Each week on its Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn accounts, CURE® asks its readers to share their thoughts with a #CureConnect discussion question. Recently, a patient with stage 3 prostate cancer offered seven tips on cancer etiquette to those who want to be sensitive caregivers. That got us thinking, and we asked: “What advice would you give someone looking to help a friend or loved one with cancer?”

Here’s what our readers shared:

  • “Just sit with them and listen and spend time with them; let them know you care.” — J.B.
  • “Be consistent in checking on them. They will need as much or more care months later. I speak from personal experience. When I was first diagnosed, there was a flurry of attention and gifts. As the weeks turned into months, people would quit paying attention to what I might need.” — B.B.
  • “Be there if they need you. Call them (and) let them know they can call you ANY TIME.” — C.K.O.
  • “Call, text ... just stay in touch (and) be there however, and as long as, they need you. Sometimes it’s hard for them to ask for help, so always be present.” — C.L.
  • “As time goes on, friends get involved in their lives and sometimes forget that just a quick phone call now and again can make a huge difference in our day. I know I can call some of my friends any time, but I don’t always want to be the one to reach out, as it can feel like I’m begging for attention. Don’t forget the friends who may need you the most.” — D.V.
  • “Check in with a text or a ‘thinking-of-you card.’ Do not say, ‘Call me if you need anything.’ You will never be called. Instead, say, ‘I want to bring you dinner. What night would be best?’” — J.W.F.
  • “They should get a second and third opinion from a large regional or state hospital if possible. Not every hospital has the same treatment options or clinical trials available. Hospitals only recommend treatments they have available. Also, some people's treatment can last a year or beyond, so they might need support for a long time.” — L.K.-S.

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