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P: 800-210-2873

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CURE Media Group.
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Cure Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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Samira Rajabi

Samira Rajabi was diagnosed with a vestibular schwannoma, also known as an acoustic neuroma in 2012. She has had ten surgeries to deal with her tumor and its various side effects. She writes a blog about her life, surgeries, recovery and experiences at LivingWithHerbert.com. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, where she studies media studies. In her spare time she plays with her two pups and spends time with her husband exploring Philadelphia.
Samira Rajabi
Health care shouldn't be a fight, but it is. I tell my story of fighting for an MRI in a hope that I illuminate the cracks in our system in a hope we can make change, so no one falls through those cracks.
Samira Rajabi
My heart seeks joy. My life is joyful, full of light. And I know trauma can live in the light, I have seen it and lived it.
Samira Rajabi
When my mom got cancer, the last thing on my mind was my own health, but she had the foresight and the care to get a genetic test so that her kids could live long and healthy lives. Today I am grateful for my mom, my whole family and the magic of science.
Samira Rajabi
The ways life hits us with various challenges is neither fair nor fun, but we can still find happiness. 
Samira Rajabi
Chronic illness causes a lot of pain, and pain always carries fear with it. One way to cope is to recognize that fear can co-exist with many other feelings. It is OK to be scared, and it is OK to keep going.
Samira Rajabi
For those of us living with (and taking care of) people living with brain tumors, cancers and other diseases that become chronic, life's challenges begin to shift, as do our outlooks. It is important for us to be able to love our bodies, our disabilities, and for the world to make space for all sorts of bodies to exist.
Samira Rajabi
When stuck in this space, it is tempting to hide from life, but with all the beauty in the world, it doesn't serve any of us to hide.
Samira Rajabi
It's hard to stop comparing our sick bodies to the people around us, but once we do, as both patients and caretakers, we learn to honor our own experiences and value ourselves in new and beautiful ways.
Samira Rajabi
When our bodies have experienced trauma, it is so easy to live in fear of what else may go wrong. But accepting that we don't know what will happen to us also means accepting that the worst is not always inevitable. Sometimes, despite our fears, we still thrive, and that is a reason to recognize that even if you've suffered, you can still be OK.
Samira Rajabi
Those of us who have suffered often fear what can go wrong with them. But the more we know our bodies, the more we can love them and ourselves.
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