CURE Magazine and curetoday.com Are Under New Management
December 01, 2014 – Mike Hennessy
Updates from the European Society for Medical Oncology
December 01, 2014 – Staff Reports
A Breast Cancer Alphabet
December 01, 2014 – Katherine Lagomarsino
Primary Care After Cancer Treatment
December 01, 2014 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
TheAnswertoCancer.org
December 01, 2014 – Elizabeth Whittington
Adult Female Survivors at Risk for Sexual Issues
December 01, 2014 – Katherine Lagomarsino
Yoga's Benefits Explored
December 01, 2014 – Kathy LaTour
Harmony Hill Retreat Center
December 01, 2014 – Elizabeth Whittington
Sunshine Act Sheds Light on Gifts to Doctors From Pharmaceutical Companies
December 01, 2014 – Lena Huang
Cancer Center Fundraiser was de la Renta's Farewell
December 01, 2014 – Elizabeth Whittington
Few Aware that Dense Breasts Increase Cancer Risk
December 01, 2014 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Surviving Caregiving
November 25, 2014 – Kathy LaTour
B-Cell Lymphomas: A Long and Winding Road
November 25, 2014 – Heather L. Van Epps, PhD
The Fitness Factor
November 24, 2014 – Laura Beil
Bad Behavior
November 24, 2014 – Jeannette Moninger
Helping Children Heal
November 24, 2014 – Maureen Salamon
Recovering from Brain Cancer Surgery Takes Time
November 24, 2014 – Jennifer L. W. Fink, RN
Rare Finds: A Rare Cancer Diagnosis
November 24, 2014 – Charlotte Huff
Guy's Guide
November 24, 2014 – Michael Irving
Chewing the Fat
November 24, 2014 – Katy Human
NORD Offers Information and Support for Patients of Rare Cancers
November 24, 2014 – Peter L. Saltonstall
Managing Thrombocytopenia
November 24, 2014 – Lacey Marlow
FDA Aims to Start Regulating Custom Diagnostic Tests
November 24, 2014 – Susan Kreimer
A Focus on a Cure for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
November 22, 2014 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Comments From Readers
November 21, 2014
FDA Approves New Uses for Existing Cancer Treatments
November 22, 2014 – Staff Reports
CURE Magazine and curetoday.com Are Under New Management
December 01, 2014 – Mike Hennessy
Updates from the European Society for Medical Oncology
December 01, 2014 – Staff Reports
A Breast Cancer Alphabet
December 01, 2014 – Katherine Lagomarsino
Primary Care After Cancer Treatment
December 01, 2014 – Len Lichtenfeld, MD
TheAnswertoCancer.org
December 01, 2014 – Elizabeth Whittington
Adult Female Survivors at Risk for Sexual Issues
December 01, 2014 – Katherine Lagomarsino
Yoga's Benefits Explored
December 01, 2014 – Kathy LaTour
Harmony Hill Retreat Center
December 01, 2014 – Elizabeth Whittington
Sunshine Act Sheds Light on Gifts to Doctors From Pharmaceutical Companies
December 01, 2014 – Lena Huang
Cancer Center Fundraiser was de la Renta's Farewell
December 01, 2014 – Elizabeth Whittington
Few Aware that Dense Breasts Increase Cancer Risk
December 01, 2014 – Beth Fand Incollingo
Surviving Caregiving
November 25, 2014 – Kathy LaTour
B-Cell Lymphomas: A Long and Winding Road
November 25, 2014 – Heather L. Van Epps, PhD
The Fitness Factor
November 24, 2014 – Laura Beil
Bad Behavior
November 24, 2014 – Jeannette Moninger
Helping Children Heal
November 24, 2014 – Maureen Salamon
Recovering from Brain Cancer Surgery Takes Time
November 24, 2014 – Jennifer L. W. Fink, RN
Rare Finds: A Rare Cancer Diagnosis
November 24, 2014 – Charlotte Huff
Guy's Guide
November 24, 2014 – Michael Irving
Chewing the Fat
November 24, 2014 – Katy Human
NORD Offers Information and Support for Patients of Rare Cancers
November 24, 2014 – Peter L. Saltonstall
Managing Thrombocytopenia
November 24, 2014 – Lacey Marlow
FDA Aims to Start Regulating Custom Diagnostic Tests
November 24, 2014 – Susan Kreimer
A Focus on a Cure for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
November 22, 2014 – Debu Tripathy, MD
Currently Viewing
Comments From Readers
November 21, 2014

Comments From Readers

CURE readers respond to the latest issue with comments and questions.
PUBLISHED November 21, 2014
Scope of Magazine Praised
I want to thank you so much for my CURE subscription. Even though I am six years out from my diagnosis, the battle continues. The fall issue of the magazine seemed to be written personally for me, because it covered so many topics I’ve had to deal with (some of which I didn’t quite understand at the time), and topics I still deal with day in and day out. Bless you for the work you do!
Sherry Chartrand, Chippewa Falls, Wisc. 

Finding Joy and Peace
Thank you for the wonderful article “Tough Talk” in your fall issue. I was diagnosed with primary peritoneal (ovarian) cancer in April 2010. After four years of continuous chemotherapy, my oncologist told us that nothing else could be done. We not only appreciated the honesty and dignity with which he delivered the news, but his encouragement to embrace a quality of life. I am now under the care of hospice, at home, for the remainder of my journey with my family and friends. We are grateful every day for our decision that allows us to find joy and peace at the end of life.
Elaine Waples, Atlantic Beach, Fla.

Portal Vein, Clarified 
In the summer 2014 issue of CURE magazine, Anne Covey is quoted as saying: “Normal liver tissue gets most of its blood supply from the portal vein, which not only carries oxygen and nutrients to the liver but also carries away the waste products that the liver normally removes from the blood.” Is that true? I thought the portal vein was a one-way avenue for nutrients from the stomach and intestines into the liver. The only exit from the liver would be the hepatic vein.
C. Walt Hammonds, San Andreas, Calif. 

Former Managing Editor Jon Garinn responds: As a result of our editing process, the sentence was constructed to imply that the portal vein carries partially oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood into the liver and carries away waste products that the liver normally removes from the blood. The blood’s waste products are primarily removed through the bile ducts. The blood that is returned to the circulation does contain some metabolic waste products, but it is returned via the hepatic veins (there are three of them) that connect to the inferior vena cava.

Late Effects of Radiation 
Peter Skurkiss’ comment about the late effects of radiation [in a June letter to the editor about the article “Burn Concern,” which appeared in the spring 2014 issue] brought up an important point: Late effects are rarely seen by radiologists, and academic studies of adverse effects don’t follow patients long enough for these effects to show up. I think that radiologists fail to warn patients because these devastating effects are vastly under-reported in the medical literature.

I have late-effect, radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy, which is slowly but progressively compromising my ability to walk. It began five years after my radiation treatment for endometrial adenocarcinoma, and it was another three years before I got a diagnosis. Most academic studies followed patients for only five years; I would not have been counted. Now, 14 years past radiation treatment, my walking continues to get worse, there is no accepted treatment, and its rarity and slow progression make it unlikely that research will be done to develop new treatments.

The only really long-term study I found followed breast cancer patients after radiation treatment for 34 years (Johansson. Timescale of evolution of late radiation injury after postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2000;48(3):745- 750). They found that late adverse effects “increased progressively over the whole 34-year follow-up period.” Ninety-two percent of study patients had arm paralysis by the end of the study.

Most patients are followed long term by tumor registries. Perhaps registries could also record long-term effects of treatment and help to fill the gap in our knowledge.
Trish Miller, Winter Springs, Fla.
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