Recommended Resources
June 11, 2009
Bookshelf
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Letters from our Readers
March 24, 2005
Message from the Editor-at-Large
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
v4n1 - A Sweet Idea
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
v4n1 - Tips to Prevent Bleeding
March 24, 2005 – Debra Wood, RN
v4n1 - Giving Platelets
March 24, 2005
v4n1 - Megakaryocytes & Platelet Production
March 24, 2005 – Susan R. Peck, PhD
v4n1 - Is There a Link to Hodgkin's Disease?
March 24, 2005 – Susan R. Peck, PhD
v4n1 - Is It Really Hodgkin's Disease?
March 24, 2005 – Susan R. Peck, PhD
Society For Integrative Oncology
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Integrative Modalities
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
The Science Behind Integrative Medicine
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Esophagitis: A Common Radiation Side Effect
March 24, 2005 – Carol L. Kornmehl, MD
Risk Factors
March 24, 2005 – Amy D'Orazio, PhD
A Confusing Array of Choices
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
What To Know Before You Go
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
Choosing a Qualified Practitioner
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
Navigating the Caregiver Terrain
March 24, 2005 – Marc Silver
The Science & Controversy Behind Touch Therapies
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
The Healing Journey
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Esophageal Cancer: A Disease on the Rise
June 27, 2005 – Rabiya S. Tuma, PhD
Recommended Resources
June 11, 2009
Bookshelf
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Currently Viewing
Letters from our Readers
March 24, 2005
v4n1 - A Sweet Idea
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
v4n1 - Tips to Prevent Bleeding
March 24, 2005 – Debra Wood, RN
v4n1 - Giving Platelets
March 24, 2005
v4n1 - Megakaryocytes & Platelet Production
March 24, 2005 – Susan R. Peck, PhD
v4n1 - Is There a Link to Hodgkin's Disease?
March 24, 2005 – Susan R. Peck, PhD
v4n1 - Is It Really Hodgkin's Disease?
March 24, 2005 – Susan R. Peck, PhD
Society For Integrative Oncology
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Integrative Modalities
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
The Science Behind Integrative Medicine
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Esophagitis: A Common Radiation Side Effect
March 24, 2005 – Carol L. Kornmehl, MD
Risk Factors
March 24, 2005 – Amy D'Orazio, PhD
A Confusing Array of Choices
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
What To Know Before You Go
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
Choosing a Qualified Practitioner
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
Navigating the Caregiver Terrain
March 24, 2005 – Marc Silver
The Science & Controversy Behind Touch Therapies
March 24, 2005 – Jennifer M. Gangloff
The Healing Journey
March 24, 2005 – Kathy LaTour
Esophageal Cancer: A Disease on the Rise
June 27, 2005 – Rabiya S. Tuma, PhD
GERD: An Increasing Problem
March 24, 2005 – Elizabeth Whittington

Letters from our Readers

Letters from CURE's readers.

PUBLISHED March 24, 2005

. . . . .

By the time I finished reading “Cured: The John Cleland Story” in the Winter 2004 Survivors’ Issue, I was celebrating and crying at the same time. My moment of truth literally crashed into me on July 1, 1997, when, at the age of 33, I was told that I had advanced breast cancer. For days my husband and I drifted around in a hopeless, desperate stupor until we walked into Dr. Ben Kundaria’s oncology office in Santa Maria, California. His office blessed us with the gifts of understanding, hope and living again. There are no words that can explain how grateful I am to him and his staff. They gave my family our lives back.

Susan Parkinson
Fallon, Ill.

. . . . .

In 2001, while trying to raise two teenagers and battle lymphoma, I met an incredible man through an online dating service. On our first date, I revealed to him my health issues, but he seemed unconcerned, which I thought was very brave, considering he had lost his first wife in 1995 to lymphoma. As our relationship grew more serious, and I faced yet another round of chemo, I gave him the chance to end our relationship. After all, he didn’t need to share the burden. As I tearfully prepared to say my goodbyes, he enfolded me in the safety of his arms and said, “Baby, this isn’t my first rodeo. I can see you through this.” And so he did. I am now in remission, and we celebrated our first wedding anniversary December 26! My life has truly been blessed with a life partner who was only looking for “happily ever after.” [See the Winter 2004 issue for an article about dating and cancer.]

Joellen Zegarac
Hobart, Ind.

. . . . .

I enjoy your magazine and give it out to patients. I just need to comment on Kathy LaTour’s choice of words in the opening paragraph of “Cured: The John Cleland Story.” I think the language used by healthcare professionals is so important, and the phrase “he had failed three grueling chemo regimens...” needs rewording. The implication is that he did not try hard enough, and thus failed. The chemotherapy can fail patients—patients cannot fail chemo. It’s just a major pet peeve of mine, and I hope to write up an article soon on our poor choice of language used with patients. Thanks for listening.

Wendy Walters, LCSW
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
Birmingham, Ala.

[Kathy responds: I agree and will watch for that language in the future.]

. . . . .

I was thrilled to see the article in the Winter 2004 issue about exercise. (My issue actually arrived on my cancer anniversary date.) I had cancer 21 years ago, and to this day, exercise plays an incredibly important role in my health, well being and life. I wanted to mention an incredible organization that I became involved with a couple years ago. Team Survivor (www.teamsurvivor.org) is a nonprofit organization that provides free fitness and supportive services to women of all ages who have dealt with the challenges of cancer in their lifetime. These programs allow women who have or had cancer the opportunity to take a proactive approach to their own health and to be in a supportive environment with other women with similar experiences.

Angie Bagnas
San Diego, Calif.

. . . . .

Words cannot express what a wonderful service you provide for cancer patients by empowering them with the knowledge to cope, understand and learn about their disease by reading the pages of CURE magazine. A recent CT scan of my thorax revealed no change, meaning my tumor had not grown larger since the last scan, but it had not shrunk either, so my symptoms persisted. I was discouraged and believed the chemotherapy treatments I had been on since August weren’t working. Then I remembered reading in the Fall 2004 issue that CT scans have limitations. Namely, they often cannot distinguish the difference between residual live tumor and dead tumor or scar tissue, especially after treatment. When I mentioned this to my doctor, he agreed and suggested I get another PET scan. The results of my latest PET scan still show activity in my thorax, but the activity has decreased by more than 50 percent, meaning my chemo treatments are effectively killing the cancer cells. I received this great news three days before Christmas and it’s the best Christmas gift I could have gotten. If I had not read about CT scans in CURE, I would not have questioned the limitations of the CT scan and most likely would not have had another PET scan revealing this wonderful news. Thanks to your outstanding publication, I feel like an empowered

Sandra J. Socha
Chicago, Ill.

. . . . .

Thank you for bringing CURE to my mailbox. I suppose this is a little strange, but it is one way that I mark my survivorship. As I read through each issue I think, yeah, I’ve done that, or yeah I’ve been there. This is the sort of stuff that makes me feel most alive after having been diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 1998.

Live strong, stay strong. Some of these are the words Lance Armstrong has marketed quite successfully. That is the way I have approached my treatments all along. After VAD treatment during the summer of 1998, I was started on a regimen of maintenance chemo to last for another year. During that time I trained to take part in The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training bicycle century ride around Lake Tahoe. I did the Tahoe ride, 104 miles, and many others since. For the summer of 2005, my goal is to ride the Erie Canal from Buffalo, New York, to Albany. So, keep up the good work. Your magazine is my only source for getting trusted and up-to-date treatment information and options. Thank you.

Steven Thomsen
Hampden, Mass.

. . . . .

I just wanted to write a short note to tell you all how overjoyed I am to receive such valuable cancer information. I have taken the magazine to work and they are in awe and plan to sign up as well. They too could not believe such valuable information is free. The magazine gives hope, especially with the survival stories as well as the latest technology. Again, words cannot thank you enough.

B. Burwell
Irving, Texas

. . . . .

Once again I find myself experiencing such gratitude for the excellent quality of your periodical. I don’t know that I am a “survivor” yet since I am not quite a year away from treatment. Nevertheless, I appreciate reading what others have to say. It gives me great hope!

Mary Ellen Neeves
St. Louis, Mo.

[Editor’s note: The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship identifies you as a survivor from the day of diagnosis and for the rest of your life.]

. . . . .

My mother was diagnosed on Jan. 1, 2002 with AML (acute myelogenous leukemia). I stumbled over one of your magazines in the waiting room at the hospital. I looked at it and said just another magazine to fool people that there is a magic pill for cancer. I put it in my workbag, and it stayed there until I was cleaning out my bag and a small article about AML was staring up at me. From that day on I read every word in every issue! My mother lost her battle on April 7, 2003, and I was there with her every step of the way.

Delissa Wolfe
Pulaski, Va.

. . . . .

Address your comments and letters to editor@curetoday.com. Letters are published at the editor's discretion and may be edited for length. If you prefer your letter not be published, please indicate.

 

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