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By Joining Registry, Men with Prostate Cancer and Their Families Can Help Peers

Men with prostate cancer may be eligible to join a patient registry that will track their treatment choices and outcomes, as well as quality-of-life measures and the health of their caregivers over time.
BY Beth Fand Incollingo
PUBLISHED January 01, 2016
Men with prostate cancer may be eligible to join a patient registry that will track their treatment choices and outcomes, as well as quality-of-life measures and the health of their caregivers over time.

The project, which will look at six-year trajectories for each patient enrolled, is known as TRUMPET (Treatment Registry for Outcomes in CRPC Patients; NCT02380274). Its goal is to shed light on the needs and treatment patterns of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in the United States. While TRUMPET will assess patient care patterns, it will not evaluate the effectiveness or value of any specific treatment or medication.

The registry is being run by Astellas and Medivation, Inc., the developers of Xtandi (enzalutamide), a hormone-blocking drug used to treat patients who have prostate cancer. The first patients were enrolled in June. The registry will enroll and evaluate 2,000 patients diagnosed with CRPC from urology and oncology sites across the United States. It will also collect data from the primary caregivers of patients, including spouses, family members and/or friends.

“While there have been many treatment advances in prostate cancer over the past few years, there is still a great deal for us to learn. The insights from TRUMPET can directly impact our research and increase our understanding of important treatment considerations,” says Jeffrey Bloss, a medical doctor and senior vice president of Astellas Pharma Global Development, Inc. “This registry provides an important building block to support our commitment to providing effective, evidence-based cancer care for patients and their caregivers.”

TRUMPET will gather information from participants about their management of the disease, including patterns of care, treatment decisions and settings, and physician referral patterns. The registry will also track information about patient health-related quality-of-life outcomes, work productivity and treatment satisfaction, as well as caregiver health-related quality-of-life outcomes associated with managing a patient with CRPC.

“As a direct result of advances in therapies available to treat patients with CRPC, treatment decisions have become more complex than ever,” says David F. Penson, chair of the department of urologic surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “TRUMPET will expand our scientific understanding of CRPC to help health care professionals, patients and their loved ones make more informed decisions about their care.”

TRUMPET is currently enrolling eligible patients and their caregivers; the study will be completed in 2020.

To inquire about registering, contact Astellas Scientific & Medical Affairs by calling (800) 888-7704, extension 5473, or emailing Astellas.registration@astellas. com.
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