• Waldenström Macroglobulinemia
  • Melanoma
  • Bladder Cancer
  • Brain Cancer
  • Breast Cancer
  • Childhood Cancers
  • Gastric Cancer
  • Gynecologic Cancer
  • Head & Neck Cancer
  • Immunotherapy
  • Kidney Cancer
  • Leukemia
  • Liver Cancer
  • Lung Cancer
  • Lymphoma Cancer
  • Mesothelioma
  • MPN
  • MDS
  • Myeloma
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Rare Cancers
  • Sarcoma
  • Skin Cancer
  • Testicular Cancer
  • Thyroid Cancer

Prescribing Patterns Differ for Rural, Urban Patients with CLL or SLL

News
Video

Where a patient lives may affect what kind of treatment they are offered for their CLL or SLL. However, second opinions and learning about one’s cancer diagnosis can help.

Recent research showed that social determinants of health may influence the treatments that patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are prescribed. This highlights the importance of patient advocacy in this population, explained Dr. David J. Andorsky, a medical oncologist and hematologist at the Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers.

“I think with cancer diagnosis, it's always useful to get a second opinion, particularly for a rare condition and that also just helps to reassure a patient that they're getting the best possible care if they hear the same thing from two different people,” Andorsky said in a recent interview with CURE®.

At the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting, Andorsky presented findings from a retrospective trial that analyzed how the prescribing of BTK inhibitors for CLL and SLL is affected by social determinants of health, which the US Department of Health and Human Services defines as, “the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning and quality-of-life outcomes and risks.”

READ MORE:BTK Inhibitors Offer a Revolutionary Treatment of Relapsed CLL/SLL

Findings from the study, which included a data analysis from more than 2,000 patients, showed that socioeconomic status and Medicaid insurance status did not influence prescribing patterns. However, patients who live in rural or urban areas did tend to experience a difference in the therapies they were prescribed.

Transcription

I think patients need to be informed about what the best therapy is for their disease or their condition. So that then they just have a sense they can go into a more informed conversation with their physician. I think with cancer diagnosis, it's always useful to get a second opinion, particularly for a rare condition and that also just helps to reassure a patient that they're getting the best possible care if they hear the same thing from two different people.

For more news on cancer updates, research and education, don’t forget to subscribe to CURE®’s newsletters here.

Related Videos
Woman with dark brown hair and pink lipstick wearing a light pink blouse with a light brown blazer. Patients should have conversations with their providers about treatments after receiving diagnoses.
Man in a navy suit with a purple tie. Dr. Saby George talks to CURE about how treatment with Opdivo could mitigate disparities in patients with kidney cancer.
Dr. Kim in an interview with CURE
Dr. Barzi in an interview with CURE
Catrina Crutcher in an interview with CURE
Related Content