Strategies for Improving Life With a Chronic Disease

Publication
Article
CUREMPN Special Issue 2023
Volume 22
Issue 03

Because MPNs can cause chronic disease that spans years or even decades, some patients need their significant other to become their caregiver.

CHRONIC DISEASES Healthcare modern medical Doctor concept | Image credit: © onephoto - © stock.adobe.com

Although not a cure, JAK inhibitors may help reduce the often-heavy symptom burden.

One patient called Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors a “miracle,” and an expert noted that they work “overnight” for some. These sentiments illustrate just how impactful treatment with JAK inhibitors has been for patients with myeloprolif- erative neoplasms (MPNs).

In this special issue of CURE, one of our feature articles examines the advances made with JAK inhibitors and how they’ve benefited patients with MPNs. Although not a cure, JAK inhibitors may help reduce the often-heavy symptom burden — something else you will read about in this issue. Setbacks and limitations, however, remain with JAK inhibitors. While one patient shares how this therapy was life-changing for him, another patient explains why he had to stop it. In addition, experts discuss the previously unmet need that is filled and the future of JAK inhibitors for patients with MPNs.

Because MPNs can cause chronic disease that spans years or even decades, some patients need their significant other to become their caregiver. The adjustment can strain a relationship and impact quality of life for both patient and caregiver. Findings from a study demonstrate that patients and caregivers may benefit from seeking support based on individual needs. This is exactly what one married couple did. CURE talked with Wim Smits, a patient with myelofibrosis, and his wife and caregiver, Harriet Randall, about how his diagnosis has affected their relationship and how counseling and social support have educated them and helped them feel not so alone.

CURE also spoke with an expert about how important it is for patients with MPNs to have a specialized care team. She advises patients with MPNs to “take a breath” and to understand that adjusting to life with a chronic disease will take time.

Because patients with MPNs often experience a heavy symptom burden — resulting from the disease and its treatments — it’s important to be proactive whenever possible. CURE spoke with a registered dietitian on how to eat differently to feel better. She shares tips on tailoring a diet to your specific needs and symptoms.

Also in this issue: How to build your own smoothie to help maintain or gain healthy weight during MPN treatment.

As always, we hope you and your families find this information helpful and inspiring. Thank you for reading.

MIKE HENNESSY JR.

President & CEO

MJH LIFE SCIENCES®

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