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How Has Cancer Changed the Way Patients Live Their Lives?

Readers of CURE share the ways that cancer has changed their lives.
BY Jessica Skarzynski
PUBLISHED September 30, 2019
It has been said that cancer changes everything. But what does that really mean?

Recently, CURE asked the members of its social media audience how cancer has changed the way they live their lives. Here are some of their most poignant responses:
 
  • I say “I love you” to every family member and friend whenever I say goodbye. - JS
  • Cancer has changed every single aspect of who I am as a person. From the way I sleep to how I celebrate holidays. - JL
  • As a survivor, I cherish everyday and try not to get angry over little things. - SF
  • I no longer work full time at my really fulfilling job as a physical therapist. Fighting cancer is now my job. - JS
  • Not sure if I have a definitive answer. Every time I think I have it figured out, another curve ball comes. Lost a few friends for sure, but found out who is really there for me. We'll see what tomorrow brings - hoping it brings some wine! - TA
  • It's like a gun being held to your head and you never know when it's going to shoot. - SA
  • I became a registered nurse after my treatment, got a job working on an oncology floor with the same health system that helped me, and just graduated again with my Bachelor’s. - DGA
  • I have to plan everything around my anticipated energy level. - JW
  • It has been bittersweet. I have an inner strength that I discovered, but a fear that sometimes paralyzes me. – KN
  • Trying to live in the moment. Not all moments are the same now but trying to make the best out of the good ones. - MW
  • I don’t waste time. I see everyone I can and do everything I feel up to doing! I plan and do! – PFM
  • Surprisingly cancer has given me gifts. I truly understand now that time is not endless. I understand that everyone has their struggles which makes me more empathetic. - GA
  • I live in constant fear of a recurrence of my ovarian cancer. It’s the first thing on my mind when I wake up in the morning, and the last thought I have before going to sleep. Cancer totally consumes you! - SPS
  • I'm taking that vacation. I never say goodbye to loved ones without telling them I love them. I'm joining survivors who teach med students what to look for and what to ask. I am trusting my intuition. - RSL
  • Life is short so live one day at a time and make the most of it. Stay focused on your blessings and what is truly important. – MP
  • I do a lot less housework. Life's too short. - RP
  • Take the trip, buy the shoes, eat the cake! - KFC
  • Appreciate more. Take each day as a gift. Cherish family. - TW
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