Olivia Newton-John Dies Decades After Receiving a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

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Actress/musician Olivia Newton-John has died after a long bout with breast cancer.

Olivia Newton-John died from breast cancer. 

CREDIT: Scott Barbour/Getty Images Entertainment via Getty Images.

Olivia Newton-John died from breast cancer.

CREDIT: Scott Barbour/Getty Images Entertainment via Getty Images.

Actress and musician Olivia Newton-John died after a decades-long experience with breast cancer, according to a statement on her Instagram page that was posted by her husband.

She was 73 years old.

“Olivia has been a symbol of triumphs and hope for over 30 years sharing her journey with breast cancer. Her healing inspiration and pioneering experience with plant medicine continues with the Olivia Newton-John Foundation Fund, dedicated to researching plant medicine and cancer,” the statement said.

The “Grease” star and voice behind the hit song “Let’s Get Physical” announced in 2017 that she was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer — this is after initially being diagnosed with breast cancer in 1992. She underwent a partial mastectomy before the cancer came back in 2013, and again in 2017.

Since making her diagnosis public, Newton-John has advocated for people affected by the disease and also established the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia, as well as the Olivia Newton-John Foundation Fund, which raises money for research toward plant-based medicine.

Back in 2018, Newton-John announced that she was using medical marijuana for her disease.

The star also was an inspiration to others with cancer. CURE® contributor Martha Carlson, who is living with metastatic breast cancer wrote in 2018, “Newton-John is a symbol of hope and inspiration to many.”

For more news on cancer updates, research and education, don’t forget to subscribe to CURE®’s newsletters here.

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