Tina Turner’s Son Dies of Cancer, NFL Team Honors Group’s $5.6 Million Fundraising Effort and More

From Tina Turner’s son, Ronnie, dying of cancer to the Miami Dolphins honoring a group of people who raised over $5 million for oncology care and research, here is what’s happening in the cancer space this week.

“Rage Against the Machine” bassist revealed that he received a prostate cancer diagnosis.

Tim Commerford, the 54-year-old bassist in the rock band, “Rage Against the Machine,” recently announced that he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer and received treatment for the disease — including the removal of his prostate — earlier this year.

His recent scans were clean, though in an interview with the magazine, “SPIN,” the musician did mention that he is experiencing fear of recurrence.

“I just got my six-month test, and it came back at zero … That’s the best I can feel for the rest of my life. Every day I get closer to that test is like, ‘F*** man, is this going to be the time when the number is going to go up and I’m going to the next thing, whatever that is?’” he said.

Tina Turner’s son died from colon cancer.

Tina Turner’s son, Ronnie, died from metastatic colorectal cancer, according to his wife and mother. He was 62 years old.

"Ronnie, you left the world far too early,” Tina, the 83-year-old singer/songwriter wrote in an Instagram post. "In sorrow I close my eyes and think of you, my beloved son."

Miami Dolphins will honor $5.6 million fundraising effort.

A group of 380 people — known as the Dolphins Challenge Cancer “Heavy Hitters” — will be honored by the Miami Dolphins after raising $5.6 million for the Dolphins Challenge Cancer, an initiative started by the NFL team in 2010 to help fund cancer research at the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The funds raised by the Heavy Hitters made up for nearly 65% of the organization’s total gift this year.

Additionally, Dolphins Challenging Cancer will introduce the Jason Jenkins Impact award, at the event honoring the donors The award is named the Miami Dolphins senior vice president of communications who unexpectedly died earlier this year from a blood clot at the age of 47 after spending nearly 14 years with the organization.

"The award will recognize an individual who demonstrates the highest level of commitment, determination and persistence to create a positive impact while proudly carrying forward the winning spirit of the Miami Dolphins, an area where Jason Jenkins pridefully thrived," according to a statement from the Dolphins.

The director of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Dr. Monica M. Bertagnolli, the director of the NCI and NIH, revealed that she received a diagnosis of HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that “appears to be confined to the breast,” according to an announcement on the NIH’s website.

“Having been an oncologist my entire career, it was always—and still is—all about the patients and survivors. It’s one thing to know about cancer as a physician, but it is another to experience it firsthand as a patient as well. To anyone with cancer today: I am truly in this together with you,” she said in the statement.

10-year-old was gifted a trip to Hawaii after completing cancer treatment.

Anatole Pham Nguyen, a 10-year-old from Massachusetts, recently completed treatment for brain cancer and received the surprise of a lifetime: a trip to Hawaii and a Hawaiian sendoff party with her family and friends, thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation and Subaru of Wakefield.

Nguyen said that she hopes to see sea life while in Hawaii, as she is an aspiring marine biologist.

"It was a tough year and we made through it, so it's just a great ending to the whole process," said Cecile Pham, Anatole's mother.

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