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CURE Media Group.
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Cure Media Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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Head & Neck Cancer

Brielle Urciuoli
In this week's episode, state senator Eli D. Bebout discusses his two bouts with cancer, and how his health struggles influenced his politics.
MIKE HENNESSY, SR.
From genetic mutations to treatment behind bars, here's a roundup of our 2018 Summer issue.
Katie Kosko
In this week’s episode of CURE Talks Cancer, we spoke with Voigt about how he noticed a lump in a woman’s neck while watching tv and utilized the power of social media to find her – which ultimately led to a thyroid cancer diagnosis.
About 40 percent of people with cancer are of working age, and typically have a need to maintain their employment throughout their treatment.
SONYA COLLINS
Instead of undergoing surgery for potential cancer, many people with thyroid nodules can safely opt for surveillance.
Jill Meyer-Lipper
Proper oral care is vital during cancer treatment, explains a dental hygienist who specialized in dental oncology.
Brielle Urciuoli
While head and neck cancer is more common in men than in women, women may actually be less likely to receive aggressive treatment for the disease, which could affect outcomes.
Lori J. Wirth, M.D.
High blood pressure is common in patients with thyroid cancer who are taking Lenvima. Here's what one expert says about managing it.
Brielle Urciuoli
The majority of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who are diagnosed with cancer are expected to live past the five-year mark, though survival and health outcomes seem to differ by disease type, according to recent research published in the journal Cancer.
Brielle Urciuoli
While having a career as a flight attendant allows individuals to travel the globe, exposure to carcinogens and frequent disruptions in circadian rhythms may increase cancer prevalence in these individuals, according to recent research published in the journal Environmental Health.
 
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